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    By Myra P. Saefong, MarketWatch, Eric Yep. Weekly supply data on tap; Saudis say they'll keep pumping oil. Oil futures closed higher Tuesday, but surrendered most of their gains from earlier in the session, ahead of a report that's expected to show another increase in crude supplies.

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    President talks about Baltimore violence. WASHINGTON-- In his first comments on the riots overnight in Baltimore, an impassioned President Obama on Tuesday called for the nation to make fighting urban poverty a priority. For too long, the U.S. has only paid attention to poverty in its cities "when a CVS burns," Obama said at a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

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    WASHINGTON-- Everyone on Wall Street expects a poor report on first-quarter U.S. growth Wednesday. The question is, just how poor-- and whether it really matters. Economists polled by MarketWatch predict gross domestic product will slow to a 1.2% in the first three months of this year from 2.2% in the fourth quarter of 2014. GDP generally reflects the value of all the goods and services produced within the country's borders.

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    Government could run out of cash in 3 months. A severe liquidity crisis that threatens to shut down Puerto Rico's government is making life difficult for U.S. municipal bond investors. The island territory has been labeled "America's Greece."

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    President Barack Obama on Tuesday strongly condemned the violence and looting that occurred overnight in Baltimore. Also at a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Obama said there was no excuse for the looting and the fires, calling it counter-productive to the grievances of the community. (END) Dow Jones Newswires 04-28-15 1412 ET Copyright (c) 2015 Dow Jones& Company, Inc..

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    By Myra P. Saefong and William Watts, MarketWatch. Traders focus on Fed meeting. Gold futures finished at their highest level in about three weeks on Tuesday, finding support from weakness in the dollar a day ahead of the Federal Reserve's statement on monetary policy.

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    Home prices in cities across the nation are picking up steam. Prices in the 20 metropolitan areas measured by the The S&P/Case-Shiller 20-City Composite Home Price Index rose 5% year over year in February, compared with a 4.5% gain in January. "We've seen a lot of people come back into the market on the buy side," said David Blitzer, chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices.

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    Every American may want to catch this bouquet. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on Tuesday about whether state bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional and, if they are, whether states with those bans have the right to refuse to recognize couples who've gotten married in the 37 states and the District of Columbia where it's now legal. The states that allow same-sex marriage encompass 72% of the U.S. population.

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    Millennial women are the slowest to have kids of any generation in U.S. history. But don't blame increasingly popular fertility innovations like egg freezing. Career ambitions appear to play a lesser role in delaying parenthood than a sputtering economy, according to a new study from the Urban Institute.Between 2007 and 2012—just before and right after the recession—birth rates among American women in their twenties declined by 15 percent, the report found. Financial hardship “causes young women who aren’t worried about the biological clock to say, ‘Things are tough right now. Let me put this off because I can,’” said co-author Nan Astone, senior fellow at the Urban Institute.Birth rates in the U.S. remained fairly stable from the eighties to the early aughts, she said, but began to dip by 2008—especially among women entering their prime childbearing years. By 2012, Millennials reproduced at a pace that would lead to 948 births per 1,000 women—“by far the slowest pace of any generation,” the report said.All races experienced a birth decline. Hispanics saw the largest: From 2007 or 2012, the rate dropped 26 percent (1,570 to 1,158).  The rate for African American women fell 14 percent in the same five year period (1,216 to 1,046) and 11 percent for white women (976 to 866).The recession hit young adults particularly hard. College students graduated into a tougher job market. Many opted to live with their parents as rent prices increased across the country.So, it’s not surprising Millennials put baby dreams on hold. There’s precedent: “Previous historical low points for twenty-something fertility rates occurred in the early 1930s and late 1970s,” the Urban Institute paper noted, “and coincided with other times of economic stress.”Marriage rates, meanwhile, have also dropped across racial groups. More than a quarter of never-married Americans, 25 to 34, report they haven’t gotten married because they’re not “financially prepared,” a recent Pew survey found.For some, no ring means no babies. The lack of marital commitment drove a disproportionate fertility dip among young white woman, the researchers found:It’s too early to tell if Millennials will have fewer children than generations past. Women born between 1980 and 2000 might catch up on childbearing in their thirties, Astone said.One thing to watch, though, is how current birth trends may affect income inequality down the line. Among Baby boomers and Gen Xers, trends in marriage and childbearing seemed to deepen differences between low and higher-income families.“Family inequality increased as single parenthood increased among already disadvantaged groups… while more advantaged young adults postponed both childbearing and marriage,” researchers wrote. “Millennial fertility might be a continuation of the trend in family divergence, or it might start a return to earlier patterns of family formation.”




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    The leader of the largest federation of U.S. labor unions has called on Hillary Clinton and other presidential hopefuls to oppose an Obama administration trade pact. AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka on Tuesday delivered his first address about the U.S. presidential election in November 2016, laying out criteria the federation's 56 member unions will use to assess candidates.

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    U.S. homeownership slipped to a 25-year low in the first quarter, but sustained strong gains in the pace at which Americans are setting up homes supported the view that the housing sector will boost economic growth this year. The seasonally adjusted home ownership rate dipped to 63.8 percent, the lowest since the fourth quarter of 1989, the Commerce Department said on Tuesday.

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    The U.S. consumer financial regulator on Tuesday fined Regions Bank $7.5 million for charging overdraft fees to customers who had not opted into that service, marking its first action against a bank for illegal overdraft practices.

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    By Martin Feldstein of Project Syndicate. Low interest rates have created dangerous risks in financial markets. CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-- The United States' economy is approaching full employment and may already be there.

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    WASHINGTON-- In the latest sign of a changing housing market, homeownership rates are at a quarter- century low, while the rental-vacancy rate is close to the slimmest proportion in more than two decades, according to government data released Tuesday. The seasonally adjusted homeownership rate, which shows the share of occupied homes in which an owner lives, fell to 63.8% in the first quarter-- the lowest proportion since the end of 1989, the U.S. Families with income both above and...

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    April index shows Americans more cautious about next six months. The big slowdown in job creation in March has evidently taken a toll on Americans' views about the U.S. economy. Consumer confidence tumbled this month to the lowest level since the end of 2014 and New Englanders were particularly sour.

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    The U.S. consumer financial regulator on Tuesday fined Regions Bank $7.5 million over allegations it charged overdraft fees to customers who had not opted into that service. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said in addition to the penalty, the bank has already refunded consumers $49 million in fees and will fully refund all remaining customers.

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    The new financial risk is the same as the old financial risk, says Simon Johnson. WASHINGTON-- The main financial risk facing the United States today looks very similar to what caused so much trouble in 2007-2008: big banks with too much debt and too little equity capital on their balance sheets. Uneven global regulations, not to mention regulators who fall asleep at the wheel, compound this structural vulnerability.

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    The hiring of accountants and other finance experts, typically the last part of the labor market to rebound from an economic downturn, is beginning to outpace overall employment in the U.S. Big U.S. staffing firms -- such as Robert Half, Kforce (KFRC), and Resources Connection  -- are finding it easier to book jobs for both temporary and full-time workers.

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    An initial reading showed U.K. growth at weakest level since 2012 in the first quarter. With only nine days left before the U.K. General Election, and polls showing a neck-and-neck race, Prime Minister David Cameron and his Conservative party are hoping for any tailwinds they can get.

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    U.S. homeownership slipped to a 25-year low in the first quarter, government data showed on Tuesday, underscoring the housing market's struggle to heal from the recession's deep scars. The seasonally adjusted home ownership rate slipped to 63.8 percent, the lowest since the fourth quarter of 1989, the Commerce Department said.