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    The final read of consumer sentiment was revised lower for August, to 91.9 from a preliminary tally of 92.9 and a July reading of 93.1. That was the first reading since the market turmoil. (END) Dow Jones Newswires 08-28-15 1013 ET Copyright (c) 2015 Dow Jones& Company, Inc..

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    U.S. consumer sentiment fell in August, a survey released on Friday showed. The University of Michigan's final August reading on the overall index on consumer sentiment came in at 91.9, down from 93.1 in July. It was lower than the survey's preliminary reading of 92.9. The final reading was the lowest since May and was below the median forecast of 93.0 among economists polled by Reuters.

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    It's a spring day on the Louisiana bayou, and Bozidar "Bo" Jakov Cibilic is hauling in a metal crate of oysters. Things haven't always been this way. Still, Cibilic, 25, was lucky. About 40,000 commercial vessels were reported lost or damaged, which represented 75% of the state's fishing vessels. It wasn't just fishermen who were hit.

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    The U.S. Federal Reserve on Friday left the door open to a September interest rate hike even while several central bank officials acknowledged that turmoil in financial markets, if prolonged, could delay monetary policy tightening.

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    In some spots in this country, it costs parents well into six figures just to eke by. The amount that a two-parent, two-child family needs just to pay the bills ranges from about $50,000 to more than $100,000 depending on where a family lives, according to data released Wednesday by the nonprofit and nonpartisan think tank the Economic Policy Institute. "This does not mean a middle-class lifestyle," says Elise Gould, a senior economist with EPI.

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    Consumer spending up 0.3% for second straight month. WASHINGTON-- Core inflation moderated in July, the government reported Friday, giving the Federal Reserve another reason to hold short-term interest rates steady at their September policy meeting. Prices as measured by the personal consumption expenditure-- the Fed's preferred way of measuring inflation-- grew just 0.3% in the 12 months ending July.

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    Consumer spending in the U.S. rose 0.3% in July, the Commerce Department reported Friday. Economists polled by MarketWatch had expected a 0.4% increase. Spending looks firmer underneath the surface as the government revised consumer spending in June to an increase of 0.3%, compared with an original estimate of 0.2% growth.

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    Recent market turmoil should not delay the Federal Reserve from raising U.S. interest rates at least once, given that the selloff and a slowdown in China have so far had little effect on the U.S. economy, a top Fed official said on Friday.

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    U.S. consumer spending rose in July as households stepped up automobile purchases, offering further evidence of strength in the economy that could keep the door open to a Federal Reserve interest rate hike this year.

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    JACKSON HOLE, Wyo.-- Recent market turmoil has gotten the attention of Loretta Mester, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, but it hasn't altered her view that the U.S. economy is ready for a modest increase in interest rates, she said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. The Fed is preparing for a Sept. 16-17 policy meeting and considering whether to raise short-term interest rates from near zero. Mester's comments suggested she could support a move despite...

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    U.S. retailers including Toys R Us are starting to negotiate with their Chinese suppliers to take advantage of lower manufacturing costs after China devalued the yuan, with many saying they want to be ready if currencies in China and other Asian countries drop more against the dollar.

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    A small but growing number of Appalachian coal communities are urging Republicans in Congress to support a proposed $1 billion federal aid program from the Obama administration to save local economies ravaged by the decline of the coal industry.

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    After the recent market turmoil, many investors seem to have decided the Federal Reserve can't raise rates in September. That could be a mistake. Earlier this month, following a strong July jobs report, the chances of the Fed lifting its range on overnight rates by one-quarter of a percentage point at its policy meeting next month seemed high.

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    Pain abroad is hitting Tiffany at home. But that may have put the jeweler's shares on sale. Tiffany's second-quarter earnings results Thursday showed the effects of the strong dollar on sales at its stores in Europe, Japan and the rest of the Asia-Pacific region.

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    Economists are still waiting for the tank to be half full. Although they have been pointing out all year what a big benefit Americans would get as a result of sliding gasoline prices, the predicted boost to consumer spending resulting from this has failed to materialize. Last summer, when oil prices were still near a multiyear high, personal consumption was growing by between 4.4% and 5% versus a year earlier.

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    Important economic data measuring the financial health consumers will be released Friday. At 8:30 a.m. ET comes Personal Income and Outlays numbers. Also expected is Consumer Sentiment Survey results at 10:00 a.m. ET. The Federal Reserve's annual Jackson Hole, Wy., Symposium, which began Thursday, continues.

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    Fischer, BOE's Carney, RBI's Rajan to discuss inflation. The Federal Reserve's Jackson Hole summit will garner special attention this year given the financial market turmoil and uncertainty over what it means for U.S. central bank monetary policy. The must-see event is a discussion on global inflation by Fed Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney and Reserve Bank of India Governor Raghuram Rajan.

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    When your Chinese food delivery guy arrives by plane. At least two Chinese restaurants take the orders, do the cooking and then hand pints of General Tso's chicken, moo shu pork and lo mein to New England Airlines. Christmas season has officially begun.