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    By the Fed's own count, there's less agreement at the central bank. A new research paper from the Federal Reserve counted the number of words in its minutes that express a quantity, like "most" or "some." The paper looked at meetings from 2005 through 2014..

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    The Federal Reserve could take a slower approach to raising interest rates if weaker-than-expected growth overseas affects the U.S. economy, Fed Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer said. "The tightening of U.S. policy will begin only when the U.S. expansion has advanced far enough-- when we have seen further improvement in the labor market and when we are reasonably confident that the inflation rate will rise to our 2% goal," Fischer said Tuesday in remarks prepared for delivery in Tel...

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    * Dollar up more than 1 percent against basket of currencies. * Euro falls below $1.09, Greek concerns growing. * U.S. data bolsters dollar buying. By Michael Connor. The dollar rose more than 1 percent against other major currencies on Tuesday, extending recent gains largely driven by increasing expectations the Federal Reserve will start raising U.S. interest rates in 2015.

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    Here's a city-by-city look at house prices, as the S&P/Case-Shiller 20- city composite showed a 0.9% monthly gain for March and a 5% year-on-year gain. Note that the cities are those selected by the Case-Shiller report, and that major metropolitan areas including Houston and Philadelphia are not included. --Seasonally adjusted, the March home price gain was an even stronger 1%.

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    New homes in the U.S. sold at an annual rate of 517,000 in April, bouncing back after a sharp drop in the prior month that was probably instigated in part by poor weather. Economists polled by MarketWatch had forecast sales to total a seasonally adjusted 490,000 in April. Although new-home sales remain well below their precession peak, shoppers have been more active in the first four months of 2015 than any time in the past seven years.

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    Sales spring back 6.8% in April to 517,000 annual rate. WASHINGTON-- Sales of new homes in the U.S. snapped back in April, and shoppers have been more active in the first four months of 2015 than any time in the past seven years, new government figures show. Sales of new single-family homes climbed 6.8% in April to an annual rate of 517,000, the Commerce Department said Tuesday.

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    U.S. consumer confidence rose in May, according to a private sector report released on Tuesday. The Conference Board, an industry group, said its index of consumer attitudes rose to 95.4 from a downwardly revised 94.3 in April. The April figure was originally reported as 95.2.

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    The Conference Board reported a slight rise in consumer confidence in May. Its index rose to 95.4 from 94.3 in April, as a gain in the present situation index outweighed a small loss in expectations. Economists polled by MarketWatch expected a reading of 93. "While current conditions in the second quarter appear to be improving, consumers still remain cautious about the short-term outlook," said Lynn Franco, director of economic indicators, in a statement.

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    Firms boost spending for second month in row after weak spell. WASHINGTON-- Orders for goods such as computers and networking gear meant to last a long time fell in April, but business investment showed renewed signs of life after a prolonged weak spell. Orders for U.S.-made durable goods dropped a seasonally adjusted 0.5% last month, the Commerce Department said Tuesday.

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    Greece's doomsday clock is within five minutes of midnight, said Matthew Weller, senior technical analyst at Forex.com, citing a document that was leaked by the International Monetary Fund over the weekend. So, currency traders, it might be time to start paying attention to the headlines about the ongoing wrangling between Greece and its creditors. After the two sides came to an agreement "in principle" back in February about extending its exiting bailout program for another four...

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    U.S. house prices rose 0.9% in March to take the year-on-year advance to 5%, according to the S&P/Case-Shiller 20- city composite index released Tuesday. With seasonal adjustment, prices were up by 1%, the report said. Nineteen of the 20 cities measured showed gains, led by the 3% jump in San Francisco; only New York saw a decline, with a 0.1% dip.

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    * Core capital goods orders rise 1.0 percent in April. * March's core capital goods orders revised higher. * Core capital goods shipments rise 0.8 percent. * Consumer confidence rises in May, house prices up in March. By Lucia Mutikani.

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    Orders for durable U.S. goods fell a seasonally adjusted 0.5% in April, matching the forecast by economists polled by MarketWatch. Yet orders minus transportation rose 0.5%, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. Orders for core capital goods- a proxy for business investment- climbed 1% to mark the second straight gain.

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    The U.S. federal funds rate, which banks charge each other to borrow excess reserves, averaged 0.13 percent on Friday after being at 0.12 percent for three straight days, U.S. Federal Reserve data released early Tuesday showed. The U.S. bond market and banks were closed on Monday for the U.S. Memorial Day holiday.

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    Syriza faction favors default, Grexit over agreeing to reforms. ATHENS-- As financial pressure mounts on Greece to sign a deal with its foreign lenders, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is facing what may be his biggest problem yet: the struggle within the ruling Syriza party over whether to swallow creditors' tough terms or default. Dissent is spreading within left-wing Syriza against the economic policies Greece is likely to have to enact in return for fresh bailout funding from...

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    HERZLIYA, Israel---Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer said Monday the central bank expects to follow a "gradual and relatively slow" trajectory of short-term interest-rate increases over the next three to four years to bring borrowing costs back to "normal" levels. Fischer said observers focus too much on when the Fed will start raising its benchmark short-term rate from near zero, and instead should think more about where interest rates are headed over time.