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    An association of Greek hotels warned on Monday that the government's move to curb withdrawals on Greek deposits is already hurting the country's tourism industry, according to the Associated Press. The association said the recent developments are already having "real negative consequences on tourism," according to a statement cited by the AP. The association added that it hoped normalcy would soon return to help protect the tourism industry and support an economic recovery...

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    A major global economic event will take place once countries including Spain and Italy get in trouble. More Greek headlines over the weekend. And it's leading to a repeat of a repeat of a repeat in the financial markets:.

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    * Hopes linger of debt deal between Greece, creditors * Greek crisis may make quarter's end more volatile * U.S. markets close Friday for Fourth of July holiday By Richard Leong NEW YORK, June 29 - U.S. Treasury yields fell to one-week lows on Monday as a breakdown in negotiations between Greece and its creditors stoked bets Athens would default on its debt, a move some traders fear could impac...

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    U.S. auto sales, a crucial economic indicator, continued their six-year run in June. Edmunds.com and Kelley Blue Book estimated that about 1.5 million light vehicles will be sold in June, equaling the best June sales since 2006 and leading to a seasonally adjusted annual sales rate of 17.3 million, the highest June SAAR since 2005.

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     Investors seeking rewards during the second half this year can explore investing in preferred stock, global equities and currencies. "We suggest investing in equities to generate growth for your portfolio not for stability or income that much," said Krishna Memani, chief investment officer with OppenheimerFunds.

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    A September interest rate hike is "very much in play" if the U.S. economy continues to strengthen, though the Federal Reserve could also wait until December to start tightening policy, an influential Fed official said in a newspaper interview.

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    Puerto Rico can no longer make payments on its $73 billion in debt, according to Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla, who warns the island is perilously close to entering a "death spiral" "The debt is not payable ... there is no other option.

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    Puerto Rico is set to release a key financial stability report by former IMF economists on Monday, officials said on Sunday, in a crucial week for the island as bond deadlines come due and investor concerns increase about the possibility for debt restructurings and a limitation on government services.

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    Greece's debt odyssey is on the brink of a tragic end to its prolonged-debt negotiations after a tumultuous weekend of surprising twists and turns and failed last-ditch negotiations. It was the sort of drama-filled weekend that even Homer would find a bit melodramatic. Officials led by anti- austerity-backed Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras have been playing hardball with the nation's international creditors for months as Greece attempts to restructure a crisis-era...

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    A September interest rate hike is "very much in play" if the U.S. economy continues to strengthen, though the Federal Reserve could also wait until December to start tightening policy, an influential Fed official said in a newspaper interview.

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    Puerto Rico is set to release a key report by former IMF economists on its financial stability on Monday, officials said Sunday, which could point toward a fix for the island but has the potential to rattle bond prices if its predictions are pessimistic.

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    Greek brinkmanship will be a familiar theme in the U.S. markets next week after the embattled country failed to convince its creditors over the weekend for an extension on its rescue package. Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis made the request, during a meeting in Brussels with his eurozone counterparts, which was immediately rejected. The move follows an announcement that the Greek government will seek a referendum to allow voters a say in whether the country should accept tax...

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    Economy needs higher pay to boost spending, U.S. growth. WASHINGTON-- Like an assembly line, the U.S. has been churning out healthy job gains of more than 200,000 a month for over a year. The pickup in hiring is great, but it's not enough by itself to push the economy to greater heights.

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    The Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry nationwide. It also helps the economy with a $2.6 spending boom over the next three years. One way it helps gay people, side from the obvious: Financial planning will no longer be hell.

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    Union workers at Exxon Mobil Corp's Beaumont, Texas, refinery agreed to an unusually long six-year contract on Thursday night, which sources say the company pushed to assure no work stoppages during a contemplated multibillion-dollar expansion.

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    President Barack Obama on Friday welcomed the Supreme Court decision to give same-sex couples the right to marry. In a speech in the Rose Garden, Obama called the ruling justice "with a thunderbolt." The president acknowledged that many Americans have religious objections to the high-court decision. "

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    Golden State needs 150% of average rain and snowpack to beat drought. After four years of extreme dry weather, all 58 counties in the state are facing severe drought conditions. But a savior may be on the way if weather predictions hold true.

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    Senator Mark Warner (D-Va.) made a fortune as an early wireless industry executive. Now, he's on a tear about the tech industry's most disruptive companies and why politicians — especially presidential candidates — aren't talking more about their impact on the labor economy.He sees a growing number of sharing-economy companies such as Uber, TaskRabbit and AirBnB transforming employment. About half of all American workers will be freelance or contractual workers by 2020, some economists predict. This trend is upending our notions of what it means to be a worker and what responsibilities a company has to provide benefits like health care and pensions. If unanswered, questions about a national social safety net for contractual workers may end up burdening the whole economy, he warns.To be clear, Warner isn't proposing federal laws just yet for part-time and contract worker benefits. He's already seeing innovative solutions from tech companies and local governments to address policy concerns. But he's trying to get candidates, policymakers and the biggest companies in Silicon Valley listening -- and says legislation at some point may be the best option.The following is an interview with Warner, edited for length and clarity.What is your concern about the sharing economy?Warner: This is a fundamental change, and yet what I find is that policy makers may not have even heard about the "Gig economy" or sharing-economy. We have 25 people running for president, and no one is talking about the fastest-growing area of work in our country. What I don't want to do is impose a Washington top-down solution, yet I don't think this should be left to a patchwork of court decisions either.How would you describe the sharing economy?Warner: I would categorize people in the sharing economy in three groups. There are millennials that we like to talk about as celebrating the choices of part-time work and who don't want to have 9-to-5 jobs and who love working on three to four things at once.  There are the people my age who are forced into this because they lost a good job during the recession and now need multiple revenue streams. And then there is the third category of people who are probably rolling their eyes saying this is nothing new and they've been working like this for the last 20 years and it's been called "just getting by."So maybe the third category provides a good case study as to what problems they've encountered over the years?Warner: These people have had to rely on government assistance when available. For the people who are not in that category and who make six figures today, we aren't worried now. But when the stuff hits the fan it's not going to be fair to the tax payer to have to deal with it later.  We have to look at different models. The Obamacare exchange is an example of one model. What are other examples?Warner: Maybe a public-private employment exchange, a disability exchange and workers' comp exchange. We could look at an old idea of building trade unions and doing hour banking so that if you were a carpenter and worked 10 to 11 hours, you could bank those hours to a third party insurance fund. That model could make some sense. There may even be consumer-driven models such as the collection of tips for Uber drivers that goes into a social insurance fund. I'm not suggesting a specific model but policy makers need to keep talking about these thing.But what about the responsibilities of companies?Warner: I was encouraged to see that with  Uber and AirBnB, they started without insurance policies but now have plans. An evolution is taking place but you need to find a way to speed it up. Don't think you never want federal legislation. Candidly, you might rather have federal legislation than 50 different state rules or thousands of municipal rules.It took lots of negative press coverage on drivers' insurance to get Uber and Lyft to change their policies for drivers. What will motive the companies to seek these changes?Warner: Some of this will come from millennials demanding it. From everything I've witnessed, millennials are a diverse and socially conscious generation that wants to work for and purchase from companies that are socially responsible.What are some specific examples of company-driven changes that encourage you?Warner: I've seen with taxes and the people at Turbo Tax and a guy out of Richmond who started Painless 1099 that  helps get rid of the hassle of the tax process for contractors. There's a group out of San Francisco called Peers, investigating a model around social insurance. We are at the beginning stages. What I'm trying to figure out is how to not slow innovation and still allow some upward economic mobility while also providing a social safety net that is collaborative and not top down.Will there eventually be a law addressing these issues?Warner: I do think at some point the sharing-economy will want legislation because you won't want to leave it simply to the courts. There needs to be a lot more conversation and discussion about this because many of these companies didn't even exist five to seven years ago.






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    The International Monetary Fund isn't just trying to solve Greece's woes, it's also doling out a lot of advice to America's Federal Reserve. IMF head Christine Lagarde has already told the Fed it should wait until 2016 to raise interest rates. The dot plot is supposed to give the public more clarity on what the Fed is likely to do on interest rates, but the IMF calls it "awkward."