DJIA: 17,689.86  -56.12 (-0.32%) | NASDAQ: 5,128.281  -0.503 (-0.01%) | S&P 500: 2,103.84  -4.79 (-0.23%) Markets status unavailable

  • Show Article Details

    America's economy picked up some momentum this spring and summer, but it didn't wow. It grew 2.3% between April and June compared to the same time a year ago, according to the Commerce Department's first estimate of gross domestic product, the broadest measure of economic activity. Many experts were predicting a stronger number in the 2.5% to 3% range.

  • Show Article Details

    Call it the "Big Bang Theory" of the housing market: Researchers are puzzled over why millions of millennials are still either renting apartments or houses with their friends-- like the characters in the popular CBS TV show-- or living at home with mom and dad. A stronger economy and a drop in the national unemployment rate over the last five years have not led to more millennials leaving home, according to an analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data by the Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan and...

  • Show Article Details

    The number of Americans filing new applications for unemployment benefits increased last. week, but remained near cycle lows in a sign that the jobs. market was gaining steam. Initial claims for state unemployment benefits increased. 12,000 to a seasonally adjusted 267,000 for the week ended July.

  • Show Article Details

    The number of people who applied for U.S. unemployment benefits rose by 12,000 to 267,000 in week ended July 25, the government said Thursday. Economists polled by MarketWatch had expected claims to increase to 275,000. Despite the increase, claims remain near the lowest level in decades, indicating the labor market is still on an upswing. The average of new claims over the past month, meanwhile, fell by 3,750 to seasonally adjusted 274,750, the Labor Department said.

  • Show Article Details

    New methods in how the government calculates gross domestic product show the U.S. economy actually grew 0.6% in the first quarter instead of contracting by 0.2%. The new approach has been incorporated going back to 2012 to correct for flaws in how the government accounts for some categories such as military outlays and spending on consumer services. Yet U.S. growth from 2012 to 2014 was reduced to an annual average of 2% instead of 2.3% as reported under the old method for...

  • Show Article Details

    The U.S. economy picked up modestly in the spring after a lackluster start to the year, expanding at an annual 2.3% rate in the second quarter. Growth was led by consumer spending on big-ticket items such as new cars as well as home construction, the government said Thursday. Economists polled by MarketWatch had expected a seasonally adjusted 2.8% gain.

  • Show Article Details

    Republican presidential candidates are hitting the books to prepare for the first debate of the 2016 election. Things could get a little nerdy when the economy comes up in the August 6 debate hosted by Fox News (NWSA). But the 2016 field is digging into the weeds. Donald Trump banters about America's trade deficit to voters.

  • Show Article Details

    * Fed says U.S. economy "expanding moderately" * U.S. Q2 GDP expands at 2.3 percent rate. By Luc Cohen and Clara Denina. Gold fell 1 percent on Thursday to a near a 5-1/2-year low as the dollar rose after data showed the U.S. economy improved in the second quarter, supporting views that the Federal Reserve would lift rates by year-end.

  • Show Article Details

     Community banks anxious for a boost from a Federal Reserve rate hike should be prepared to wait. The initial interest-rate increase, which Fed Chair Janet Yellen indicated will be this fall, is a small first step. The process will require time and experimentation, Christopher McGratty, an analyst with Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, said in an interview.

  • Show Article Details

    Updated from 6:43 a.m. Here are 10 things you should know for Thursday, July 30: 1. -- U.S. stock futures were sinking as investors take in the GDP number Thursday morning and digest that the Federal Reserve didn't raise interest rates Wednesday. European stocks had a good start Thursday with a raft of earnings announcements in London and elsewhere and despite the volatility in Asia.

  • Show Article Details

    India is set to surpass China as the world's most populous country -- and much sooner than previously thought. China now has a population of 1.38 billion, compared to India's 1.31 billion, according to new data from the United Nations. If the data proves correct, India will become the world's most populous country six years earlier than previously estimated.

  • Show Article Details

    U.S. economic growth accelerated in the second quarter as a pick-up in consumer spending offset the drag from soft business spending on equipment, suggesting a steady momentum that could bring the Federal Reserve closer to hiking interest rates this year. Gross domestic product expanded at a 2.3 percent annual rate, the Commerce Department said on Thursday.

  • Show Article Details

    Says needs only' some' improvement in labor market before hiking. The Federal Reserve was slightly more upbeat about the economy on Wednesday, leaving its options open for an interest- rate hike at one of the three meetings left this year. By making subtle changes to the six-paragraph policy statement, "the Fed did just enough to preserve the option to hike rates at the September meeting," said Eric Green, head of rates and economic research at TD Securities.

  • Show Article Details

    MarketWatch live-blogs Facebook's earnings report, which is expected to include a focus on video ads from CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg. Fed will raise rates in September. The Federal Reserve will likely raise interest rates in September after it acknowledged that its two main preconditions for a rate hike have been met, writes Rex Nutting.

  • Show Article Details

    The state of Illinois and its biggest labor union on Wednesday extended for two-months an agreement preventing strikes or lockouts while contract negotiations continue. Republican Governor Bruce Rauner also vetoed a bill sought by public employee labor unions that would send collective bargaining disputes to binding arbitration.

  • Show Article Details

    The U.S. is not at risk of breaching the debt ceiling before Oct. 30, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said Wednesday, in a new estimate sent to Congressional leaders. Treasury has been using so-called extraordinary measures since mid-March. Lew told the lawmakers that those measures will now last through the end of October.

  • Show Article Details

    By Joseph Adinolfi, MarketWatch, Hiroyuki Kachi. The dollar strengthened against its rivals Wednesday after Federal Reserve policy makers left the door open for a September interest-rate hike in an updated statement released after the end of their two-day July meeting. Policy makers modified the statement to say they only need to see "some" further improvement in the labor market before raising the central bank's benchmark interest rate, which means that the nonfarm payrolls...