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    The protesters have followed the world’s most powerful central bankers into the mountains of Wyoming. They have demonstrated in front of the Federal Reserve’s august headquarters in Washington. Now, they are taking their message directly to Wall Street.Or, rather, two blocks away to Liberty Street, home to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The campaign, known as “Fed Up,” has called on the nation’s central bank to leave its target interest rate at zero until the economy is stronger. Its members include activists, community groups and faith organizations, and they say the New York Fed has ignored their requests for a meeting with bank President William Dudley. On Tuesday, they plan to protest outside his offices.“He can’t be shuttered away from the public that he’s supposed to be serving,” said Jean-Andre Sassine, a 48-year-old Queens Village resident who plans to be at the demonstration. “We are the consumers that drive the economy. He needs to listen to us on the street doing the 9 to 5 to see what’s really working, what’s really not.”The New York Fed had no comment on the group's request for a meeting. Organizers said they called the bank’s main phone number but were not allowed to speak or leave messages for Dudley’s staff. A letter and an e-mail to the bank’s main addresses were not returned, they said.The letter asks the New York Fed to ensure that banks are not discriminating against black and Hispanic customers. It calls for more transparency in the selection of regional bank presidents, which are chosen by the bank’s board of directors and approved by the Fed board of governors in Washington. The group wants two members of the public to serve on any search committees for Dudley’s eventual replacement, among other requests.“Given the importance of the position, and the continued economic struggles for families across The district, we believe that the selection of the next President of the New York Federal Reserve is too important to happen in secrecy,” the letter states.Fed Up met with Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen and other Fed governors in Washington in the fall. Campaign director Ady Barkan said workers shared their personal stories and their perspectives on the job market. Since then, the coalition has reached out to the heads of the Fed’s 12 regional banks with mixed results.The group has met with Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren and is slated to meet with San Francisco Fed President John Williams next month. It is in the process of scheduling a meeting with Minneapolis Fed President Narayana Kocherlakota. The group said other banks have declined or not responded to meeting requests.A spokeswoman for the St. Louis Fed said the bank has exchanged "friendly" phone calls with campaign members but that no meeting is on the books yet because of scheduling issues on both sides. Jean Tate, a spokeswoman for the Atlanta Fed, said the bank had not yet received a meeting request, though the campaign said a letter was mailed June 8.“We are willing to listen to anyone and would welcome this group to share their views,” Tate said.The Fed is a surprising target for activist groups that historically have aimed their fire at large companies and elected officials. The campaign is being led by the Center for Popular Democracy. New York Communities For Change, one of the groups involved in Tuesday’s protest, is also behind the push for better pay for fast food workers in the state and a $15 minimum wage.Monetary policy is much less concrete. The Fed is in the midst of a heated debate over the right time to raise the target for its benchmark interest rate, which has been at zero for more than six years. The arguments are often esoteric dissertations on topics such as the non-accelerating inflation rate of unemployment, optimal control theory and disinflation. Though most central bank officials expect the Fed to raise its target rate this year, but a vocal minority is pushing to delay until 2016.The members of Fed Up want to add more Main Street voices to the debate. Amid gridlock in Washington, the Fed’s easy-money stance has been the only reliable source of federal stimulus in recent years. And the coalition worries the economy is still too weak for the Fed to withdraw its support.The group has pointed to stagnant wage growth as a sign that many communities have yet to recover from the wounds of the Great Recession -- and a reason for the Fed to be even more patient in raising its target rate. During last summer’s annual meeting of elite economists and policymakers in Jackson Hole, Wyo., members of the group showed up carrying signs and wearing shirts with the slogan “What recovery?”“The Fed needs to keep interest rates low even though a lot of the talking heads are worried about inflation and just letting things ride. All that’s on paper,” Sassine said. “The Fed and the people in these ivory towers never hear what’s happening on life on the ground.”






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    The Greek government has published the text of the question for Sunday's referendum. A Greek political blogger published an English translation, seen below, on Twitter that has been cited by several media outlets. Greece's creditors have refused Greece's request to extend its current bailout program by a week, so it's unclear how they would react if Greek citizens vote "yes" on Sunday.

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    A key Federal Reserve official says the central bank may lift interest rates in September, but he acknowledges that the tumultuous situation in Greece is a "wild card" that could impact plans. William Dudley, the president of the New York Fed and vice chairman of the Federal Open Market Committee, told the Financial Times in an interview that an interest-rate hike at either the September or December meeting was a possibility. "If we hit 2.5% growth in the second quarter and it looks...

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    * Pending home sales increase 0.9 percent in May. * Contracts at highest level since April 2006. * Contracts rise in two out of four regions. By Lucia Mutikani. Contracts to buy previously owned U.S. homes rose to their highest level in just over nine years in May, in a further boost to the housing market and the broader economic outlook.

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    Greeks can't accept creditors' proposal without rejecting Syriza. A group of Morgan Stanley analysts said in a research note released over the weekend that Greece's leaders are juggling an' impossible trinity' of goals: keeping the euro, achieving more accommodating bailout terms and holding on to power. If Greece votes' no' at the referendum, Syriza will likely hold on to power, but Greece will likely default on its payments to official creditors and leave the euro.

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    Greece is stuck with a "unique" problem, caught in an emerging-markets style debt spiral, but without the same tools available to solve the crisis, a top emerging-markets expert said on Monday. "Greece has a classic emerging-market problem, which is they issued debt in a currency that they actually don't have control of. It's no different than Mexico issuing debt in dollars, "said Peter Marber, head of emerging markets investments at Loomis, Sayles& Co., at the sidelines of the Fund Forum...

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    Greece only makes up 0.3% of the global economy, but it's causing a global stock market sell-off. U.S. stocks suffered their worst plunge so far in 2015 on Monday. The Dow shed 350 points, nearly a 2% drop.

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    Greek banks will open 850 branches on Thursday, but only to pay pensions, a Greek government official said Monday, according to Reuters. The banks will remain shut for all other business, according to the report. The Greek government over the weekend closed the country's banks and imposed capital controls in a bid to halt deposit flight after talks with international creditors broke down.

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    Contracts to buy previously owned U.S. homes rose to their highest level in just over nine years in May, in a further boost to the housing market and the broader economic outlook. The National Association of Realtors said on Monday its Pending Home Sales Index, based on contracts signed last month, increased 0.9 percent to 112.6, the highest level since April. 2006.

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    Pending home sales in May rose to their highest level in over nine years, the National Association of Realtors said Monday. The pending home sales index rose 0.9% in May after a slight downward revision in April, the NAR said. The index level of 112.6-- 100 was the average level of activity in 2001-- is the highest since April 2006 and up 10.4% from May 2014. A sale is listed as pending when the contract has been signed but the transaction has not closed, though the sale usually is finalized...

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    An association of Greek hotels warned on Monday that the government's move to curb withdrawals on Greek deposits is already hurting the country's tourism industry, according to the Associated Press. The association said the recent developments are already having "real negative consequences on tourism," according to a statement cited by the AP. The association added that it hoped normalcy would soon return to help protect the tourism industry and support an economic recovery...

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    A major global economic event will take place once countries including Spain and Italy get in trouble. More Greek headlines over the weekend. And it's leading to a repeat of a repeat of a repeat in the financial markets:.

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    * Hopes linger of debt deal between Greece, creditors * Greek crisis may make quarter's end more volatile * U.S. markets close Friday for Fourth of July holiday By Richard Leong NEW YORK, June 29 - U.S. Treasury yields fell to one-week lows on Monday as a breakdown in negotiations between Greece and its creditors stoked bets Athens would default on its debt, a move some traders fear could impac...

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    U.S. auto sales, a crucial economic indicator, continued their six-year run in June. Edmunds.com and Kelley Blue Book estimated that about 1.5 million light vehicles will be sold in June, equaling the best June sales since 2006 and leading to a seasonally adjusted annual sales rate of 17.3 million, the highest June SAAR since 2005.

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     Investors seeking rewards during the second half this year can explore investing in preferred stock, global equities and currencies. "We suggest investing in equities to generate growth for your portfolio not for stability or income that much," said Krishna Memani, chief investment officer with OppenheimerFunds.

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    A September interest rate hike is "very much in play" if the U.S. economy continues to strengthen, though the Federal Reserve could also wait until December to start tightening policy, an influential Fed official said in a newspaper interview.

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    Puerto Rico can no longer make payments on its $73 billion in debt, according to Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla, who warns the island is perilously close to entering a "death spiral" "The debt is not payable ... there is no other option.

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    Puerto Rico is set to release a key financial stability report by former IMF economists on Monday, officials said on Sunday, in a crucial week for the island as bond deadlines come due and investor concerns increase about the possibility for debt restructurings and a limitation on government services.

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    Greece's debt odyssey is on the brink of a tragic end to its prolonged-debt negotiations after a tumultuous weekend of surprising twists and turns and failed last-ditch negotiations. It was the sort of drama-filled weekend that even Homer would find a bit melodramatic. Officials led by anti- austerity-backed Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras have been playing hardball with the nation's international creditors for months as Greece attempts to restructure a crisis-era...

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    A September interest rate hike is "very much in play" if the U.S. economy continues to strengthen, though the Federal Reserve could also wait until December to start tightening policy, an influential Fed official said in a newspaper interview.