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    Drug maker Cortendo AB has filed for an initial public offering, seeking to sell up to $86.3 million in ordinary shares, according to a filing on Friday. The company, incorporated in Sweden and based in the U.S., focuses on drugs for rare endocrine disorders and other rare diseases. It warned it has never generated any revenues from product sales and "may never be profitable."

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    Naver Corp (NHNCF) is still preparing an IPO for its messenger app service unit Line Corp, but earnings and market conditions must improve, Naver's CFO said on Friday. Documents for Line's initial public offering continue to be under review by authorities in both the U.S. and Japan, Hwang In-joon told Reuters, but said markets were currently too volatile to give a timetable for the listing.

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    Management at state-controlled Petróleo Brasileiro SA has urged the company's board to delay a planned initial public offering of its fuel distribution unit as market conditions soured, a person with direct knowledge of the situation said on Thursday.

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    Management at state-controlled Petróleo Brasileiro SA recommended the company's board in a recent meeting to delay a planned initial public offering plan of its fuel distribution unit due to souring market conditions, a source with direct knowledge of the situation said on Thursday.

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    The chief executive of Ferrari is expected to step down ahead of the luxury sportscar maker's initial public offering later this year to be replaced by Fiat Chrysler chief Sergio Marchionne, two sources said on Thursday. Marchionne is already chairman of Ferrari. Fiat Chrysler will list 10 percent of Ferrari after October 12 and spin off the unit.

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    Brazilian state-controlled lender Caixa Econômica Federal is inclined to offer fewer shares of its insurance unit in an initial public offering this year should the partnership that helped create the subsidiary be renewed ahead of the deal, two sources with knowledge of the plans said on Thursday.

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    'Unicorns' that haven't yet gone public are running out of time. The scene for initial-public offerings of the last few years has been quite a rager. Starting a little over three years ago with the massive Facebook offering and up through more recent tech darlings like GoPro and Fitbit, investors have had plenty of newly minted tech stocks to toy with.

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    Investors burned by China are in no mood to put money into high-valuation tech IPOs that won't be able to deliver on their promises, says Jeff Reeves. Tesla Model S scores 103 from Consumer Reports on 100- point scale. More powerful version of all-electric sedan earns a' rare' high score, Consumer Reports said.

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    Citigroup (C) and Morgan Stanley (MS) will lead the market debut of credit card processor First Data, in what will be one of the biggest initial public offerings of the year if it goes ahead. First Data, which is owned by private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co, disclosed the lead underwriters in an updated registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission late on Tuesday.

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    * Bankers hope turmoil will end before September. * ABN Amro, Poste Italiane expected in second half. * Lower risk of interest rate hikes seen as positive. By Freya Berry, Emiliano Mellino and Sinead Cruise. Bankers still hope to float scores of companies on Europe's shell-shocked stock markets in coming weeks, unless a summer selloff sparked by China's economic woes extends into September.

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    The Dutch government agency overseeing the privatisation of ABN Amro named eight banks on Thursday to participate in the bank's initial public offering of shares. ABN Amro, nationalized in 2008 during the financial crisis, is preparing for an IPO later this year under the auspices of the Netherlands Financial Investments agency.

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    The Dutch government agency overseeing the privatisation of ABN Amro on Wednesday named eight banks to participate in the initial public offering of shares. ABN Amro, nationalised in 2008, is preparing for an IPO later this year under the auspices of the Netherlands Financial Investments agency.

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    Some venture-backed private companies have been taking their sweet time to going public lately, but with the recent market roller coaster, will they now rush toward an exit? Onlookers have marveled for months at the eye-popping valuations coming out of the venture capital industry.

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    Brazilian insurer Caixa Seguridade Participações SA and reinsurer IRB Brasil RE SA on Tuesday filed plans for initial public offerings that their shareholders expect to raise a combined 13 billion reais should an across-the-board market rout ease in coming weeks.

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    Brazilian state-controlled bank Caixa Econômica Federal's insurance unit filed on Tuesday for an initial public offering, the first in a wave of offerings anticipated by state firms this year. Caixa will pursue a secondary offering of the Caixa Seguridade Participações SA unit, according to a prospectus filed with securities industry regulator CVM on Tuesday.

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    IRB Brasil RE SA, Brazil's largest reinsurer, filed on Tuesday a plan for an initial public offering in the São Paulo Stock Exchange. Shareholders including BB Seguros Participações SA, Bradesco Auto RE and Itaú Seguros, all three part of Brazil's top-three commercial lenders, will sell some of their stakes in IRB Brasil as part of the IPO plan, according to a prospectus on the transaction.

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    Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. (BABA) rebounded Tuesday morning, moving its shares back above the price commanded in its record-breaking initial public offering. The Chinese e-commerce giant opened with a 5.4% jump at $68.84 Tuesday, a day after. Alibaba Chief Executive Daniel Zhang earlier Tuesday, writing, "Do not let the fog cloud your vision; broaden your horizons to see the bigger picture."

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    Twitter Inc. (TWTR) opened at $26.27 Tuesday, above its initial public offering price of $26. Shares of Twitter were up 2% in early market trade. Twitter fell below its IPO price for and opened below its IPO price Aug. 21 and on Monday, when the stock plummeted 17%. Shares of Twitter have fallen 3% in the past week compared to the S&P 500' s loss of 2%.

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    After shares slide lower than IPO price, Zhang says,' Put your mind at peace'. A day after Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.' s stock price dipped below its initial public offering price for the first time, its chief executive in an open letter told employees to forget the company's share price. "Do not let the fog cloud your vision; broaden your horizons to see the bigger picture," Daniel Zhang wrote in the letter issued Tuesday.

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    Apple chief Tim Cook sure sounded like he was spooked Monday.After a steep plunge in China's stock market and as Apple's stock prepared to nosedive ahead of the open of U.S. markets, he took the unusual step of sending an e-mail to CNBC's "Mad Money" host Jim Cramer saying that Apple was going to be okay."I can tell you that we have continued to experience strong growth for our business in China through July and August," Cook wrote, noting he gets daily updates on Apple's business in China.That Cook, head of the world's largest company by market capitalization, would take the time to pen such a missive seemed to perfectly capture the depth of panicky concern hitting the markets Monday, especially in a tech sector struggling to weather China's economic storm. At the same time, the jittery markets stoked fears that a host of tech start-ups preparing to go public would delay their plans.Cook's brief letter, which was shared on Twitter by Cramer's CNBC colleague Carl Quintanilla and then read on-air, appeared to calm market jitters, even as it raised eyebrows. As Cook's note was being shared widely, Apple's stock -- which initially plummeted as much as 13 percent -- made up most of those losses and ended down 2.6 percent. The reversal helped lift the rest of U.S. markets, as well.The wild gyrations of Apple and U.S. markets highlighted a deepening concern that the tech sector may be saying goodbye to a years-long boom. More than in other industries, the sky-high stocks of Apple, Facebook (FB) and Google (GOOG) are built on the assumption of future growth and the ability to exponentially expand sales of gadgets and acquisition of new subscribers outside the United States.For a while, the potential for growth looked spectacular, driving share prices up. But any hint that global sales of smartphones or other services may fall short makes those stocks fall even harder.Shares of leading tech companies were among the hardest hit early Monday, with Facebook (FB) down as much as 13 percent and Google down 4 percent at one point. The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite index was down as much as 5.1 percent before closing down 3.82 percent to a 10-month low of 4526.25."The tech industry is a barometer of economic progress and innovation. Therefore its success is an indicator of general economic progress, which eventually translates into growth," said Cristian Tiu, a professor of business at the University of Buffalo School of Management.But what's really terrifying executives and investors in the technology sector is the chilling effect a global markets slide could have on the many richly funded start-ups that aren't even trading yet on exchanges.With so much uncertainty and market volatility, Silicon Valley firms could postpone initial public offerings, cooling a white-hot market for venture funding that has fueled the most lucrative environment for start-ups in history.Already, executives at RainDance Technologies, a firm that makes genomic tools to detect cancer and other diseases, announced Monday they have pulled their plan to go public, according to Reuters.And the big question is what will happen to the hundreds of start-ups -- a record 131 are valued at more than $1 billion -- that are now all dressed up for IPOs but with no place to go.One prominent venture capitalist in Silicon Valley is warning of casualties. Benchmark Capital partner Bill Gurley, who has invested in start-ups including Uber and GrubHub (GRUB), wrote in a series of tweets last week that the stock market movements will directly affect the start-up environment."Tech stocks have been getting crushed the past 6 weeks. Many names are down 25-50% from their highs. Today was very tough," Gurley wrote in a tweet last week. "One might reasonably assume that this would have an adverse impact on late stage private market liquidity and valuation. I certainly do. If so, we may be nearing the end of a cycle where growth is valued more than profitability. It could be at an inflection point."Known as "unicorns," the venture-funded firms with valuations of more than $1 billion have exploded in number to 131 companies valued at a total of $485 billion, according to venture capital research firm CB Insights. The sheer quantity of unicorns has for months caused concern of a start-up bubble, with investors racing to put money into bleeding-edge innovators and their many imitators, when logically not all will thrive or even survive.Among the most anticipated start-ups are Uber, valued around $51 billion; AirBnB, valued at $25 billion; and Snapchat, valued at $16 billion.None of those valuations is really a problem if the markets are steady -- or, even better, continuing to rise. These tech start-ups aren't profitable and are spending heavily on their expansion into global markets. Some haven't shown a path to profit but are built on the promise of future growth.Many, including Uber and AirBnB, have attracted massive investments by venture capital firms with the promise they will expand into China, India and other emerging markets.After early investments from seed and venture capital firms, the way to continue growing and to raise capital for expansion is typically through two paths: initial public offering on stock markets or acquisition.Now, with stocks in turmoil, the fates of these companies are in question. They will have to rely on venture investments for their expansion plans. Venture capital investors will be more cautious about their bets. If China's growth continues to slow and global markets stay in a slump, eventually the funding of venture capital firms could soften."It's worrying for companies who were planning to go IPO and are now forced to stay private," said Matthew Wong, a research analyst at CB Insights. "Those big funding rounds in the last year or two will be crucial to moving forward because the IPO window is closed right now."Related: