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    NEW YORK-- As Etsy gears up for its initial public offering, investors may be anxiously waiting to get their hands on some shares. Based in Brooklyn, NY, the e-commerce site, which sells homemade wares, applied to list on the Nasdaq and is planning to sell 16.6 million shares priced at $14 to $16 a piece. Here are six products on Etsy specifically aimed at investors, starting with inspirational posters of your favorite investor or entrepreneur.

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    NEW YORK-- Online marketplace Etsy on Tuesday launched the roadshow for its planned initial public offering. The company is planning to list on the Nasdaq under the ticker ETSY, and will sell 16.6 million shares, priced at $14 to $16.. The Brooklyn, New York-based company was founded in 2005 by Rob Kalin as he was searching for a place to sell his handmade wooden computers.

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    Etsy Inc, which operates a website that sells handmade goods and craft supplies, said its initial public offering was expected to be priced at $14-$16 per share. The offering of 16.66 million common shares is expected to raise about $266.65 million at the top end of the expected range, valuing Etsy at about $1.78 billion.

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    Hedge-fund manager Jonathan Sands gushed in a January email that shareholders of Uber Technologies Inc. could quadruple their money in two to four years. "The numbers behind Uber are astounding," he wrote. The email was a sales pitch for an investment fund with $100 million of stock in the privately owned, smartphone-based car service, which Sands said he was getting "directly" from Uber to sell to other investors, minus a management fee and cut of the profits for himself.

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    The number of companies that went public in the first quarter slowed to a trickle, but the pipeline for future deals remains strong. The 34 IPOs during the period was the lowest since 31 two years ago, according to Renaissance Capital LLC. Moreover, the $5.4 billion in combined proceeds was the smallest since the third quarter of 2011..

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    Indian biotechnology firm Biocon Ltd could file a prospectus for a share listing for its research services business arm Syngene International within the next two months, two sources directly involved in the process said. The IPO could fetch up to 10 billion rupees, said one of the sources.

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    TransUnion, one of the largest credit bureaus in the United States, filed with U.S. regulators on Tuesday for an initial public offering of common stock. The company, which sells credit reports and services to business, listed Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan Securities, Deutsche Bank Securities Inc and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith among underwriters to the IPO.

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    India's Videocon d2h Ltd, the satellite television arm of Videocon Group, will have to file a new draft prospectus for an initial public offering in domestic markets after fund raising via American depositary shares, Saurabh Dhoot, director of the company, told Reuters.

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    March 31 (Reuters) - Goldman Sachs (GS) led underwriting rankings in Asia ex-Japan equity capital markets (ECM) in the first quarter of 2015, preliminary data released by Thomson Reuters showed. Total ECM deal volumes in the region's bourses rose 18.4 percent from the year-earlier quarter to $50 billion, according to data through March 27. Proceeds from follow-on deals surged 37.1 percent to $38.7 billion, a record for the first quarter and helping more than offset a 19 percent drop in initial public offerings to $11.3 billion. Following is a list of the region's top ECM underwriters in the first three months of the year and the estimated fees earned on deals. Bank Deal volume Change Rank Rank (in $ mln) from Q12014 Q1 2015 Q1 2014 --------------------------------------------------------------- Goldman Sachs (GS) 7,725 127.2 pct 1 1 UBS 5,334 150.4 pct 2 3 CITIC 1,935 28.0 pct 3 10 Morgan Stanley 1,882 51.6 pct 4 12 JPMorgan 1,867 72.5 pct 5 15 Everbright Securities 1,732 N/A 6 - Credit Suisse 1,484 -7.8 pct 7 8 Macquarie 1,479 288.3 pct 8 24 Haitong Securities 1,372 -15.8 pct 9 7 Deutsche Bank 1,321 113.5 pct 10 18 ---------------------------------------------------------------- INDUSTRY TOTAL 49,991 18.4 pct Source: Thomson Reuters --------------------------------------------------------------- Bank Q12015 fees Change (in $ mln) from Q12014 --------------------------------------------------------------- CITIC 68.7 32.6 pct UBS 62.0 10.9 pct China Investment Securities 37.3 2,844.0 pct Guosen Securities 36.9 -36.5 pct China Securities 35.7 -42.7 pct Morgan Stanley 30.6 2.2 pct GF Securities 30.4 -36.4 pct Macquarie 28.1 159.9 pct Sinolink Securities 27.9 64.7 pct Haitong Securities 26.8 -53.7 pct ---------------------------------------------------------------- INDUSTRY TOTAL 1,009.4 -9.0 pct Source: Thomson Reuters/Freeman Consulting (Reporting by Elzio Barreto in Hong Kong; Editing by Anand Basu)

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    GoDaddy's strong brand and solid footing in the web-domain niche suggests its initial public offering may give a boost to the tech sector, where the number of companies going public has dwindled compared with last year.

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    The Dutch government will reconsider selling off ABN Amro [ABRGPA.UL], Finance Minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem said, after senior managers agreed to give up a controversial pay rise that had stalled progress on the bank's proposed share listing.

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     The Blackstone Group  timed the top of the market perfectly with its initial public offering in June 2007; is the planned spinoff of its advisory unit, PJT Partners, a signal that the market is cresting? . "It's a great question. Must Read: 10 Stocks Billionaire John Paulson Loves. Blackstone isn't the only deal adviser tempted to cash out.

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    The number of U.S. initial public offerings fell sharply in the first quarter as shaky equities and commodities markets took their toll, after a record number of companies went public last year. U.S. IPOs raised $4.7 billion from 26 offerings in the first quarter, nearly half of the $8.6 billion from 46 offerings in the same period last year, according to Thomson Reuters data.

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    The number of U.S. initial public offerings fell sharply in the first quarter as shaky equities and commodities markets took their toll, after a record number of companies went public last year. U.S. IPOs raised $4.7 billion from 26 offerings in the first quarter, nearly half of the $8.6 billion from 46 offerings in the same period last year, according to Thomson Reuters data.

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    Before Steve Case co-founded America Online 30 years ago and became a billionaire, his second job out of college was helping develop new styles of slices in Wichita, Kansas, for Pizza Hut. The food business, he quickly found, was packed with risks and surprises, making it a minefield for entrepreneurs.“It’s one thing to create one product in one particular restaurant,” Case said. “It’s another thing to roll it out to 5,000 restaurants, where the chefs are 16-year-old kids who have worked there for a few hours.”Yet even as a big name venture capitalist, the 56-year-old Case hasn’t shied away from food. Speaking Thursday at Changing the Menu, part of the America Answers event series hosted by the Washington Post, Case said the $1 trillion food business is “ripe for disruption” and one of America’s most promising growth industries.Case’s Washington venture-capital firm Revolution has made several high-profile bets on food, including Sweetgreen, a fast-casual salad shop; OrderUp, a food-delivery service focused outside the biggest cities; and Revolution Foods, a school-lunch startup serving 1.5 million meals to students in 1,000 schools every week. And that, Case said, could only be the beginning.“There are opportunities to improve the way things are done at every level: How food is produced, exported, processed, consumed,” Case said in an interview this week. “Our focus … is on investing in people and ideas that can change the world, and it’s harder to imagine anything that changes the world as much as food.”Part of what makes the food industry so appetizing, Case said, are the fundamentals. The barriers to entry, and costs, to start a food enterprise are so low, considering cheap bulk ingredients and the modest wages of servers, cooks and other workers.But the profit margins for everything from food trucks to farm-to-table cafes like Sweetgreen, what he called “the next Chipotle,” can stretch incredibly high, especially as eaters prove themselves increasingly amenable to paying extra for fresh cuisine.That helps explain why Case thinks so many successful food companies have rested on their laurels, and given their competition a chance to use tech to come out ahead. Restaurants, he adds, can be some of the best places to try out pilot concepts that can be rolled out quicker, in specific markets and with a smaller footprint than a broader nationwide launch.Sweetgreen, which started in Washington in 2007, has proven to be one of the early stars of the fast-casual movement, a trend popularized particularly by millennial eaters with what Case called a “growing desire for healthy options.” More than 20 percent of the salad shop’s orders came through the chain’s mobile app, and Case expects most will start that way within three years.Far from super-saturated Silicon Valley, successful food startups can often bloom in smaller, less-watched markets: Chipotle launched in Denver; Panera Bread (PNRA) in St. Louis; Zoe’s Kitchen, a fast-casual upstart that went public last year, in Plano, Texas.That’s partly why Case will embark on a 1,200-mile road trip in May, called “Rise of the Rest,” during which he will invest $100,000 at a time with entrepreneurs in cities like Richmond, Atlanta and New Orleans.He cited several cities in middle America as “great startup meccas,” largely because they’ve been overlooked by investors focused on the coasts. “The middle of the country understands agriculture,” he said, “therefore they understand the beginnings of this revolution in food culture.”Mammoth stock debuts over the last year, including the initial public offerings of Shake Shack (SHAK), Potbelly and Zoe’s Kitchen, have piqued investors’ interest and heated up competition. Venture capitalists poured $1.1 billion into food and beverage companies worldwide in the first half of 2014, up from $1.6 billion in all of 2013, Dow Jones VentureSource data show.But even with the rivalries, many investors have pushed ahead because, as investor and tech entrepreneur Ali Partovi told the Wall Street Journal in July, “the gains available to the winners are so large.”Case’s early-stage investments are already going head-to-head with some of this competition, as with the Baltimore-based OrderUp, which in August raised $7 million in early Revolution-led venture funding. The delivery service focused on second- and third-tier cities, like Phoenix and Denver, is already competing with a raft of similar services like Caviar, DoorDash and SpoonRocket.But not all cater to busy markets or what he called the “elite foodie community.” Revolution Foods, which was started by two mothers and is a growing player in the $20 billion school-lunch industry, intends to compete with mega-competitors like Lunchables in serving the growing need for cheap, healthy meals.Food is only one focus of Revolution’s several dozen investments, including car-sharing startup Zipcar, fitness app RunKeeper and coupon site LivingSocial. But he said it was one the firm’s most important sectors, and one that had massive effects on the company’s other investments: Even health care, he said, “begins at the end of your fork.”“We’re in the first days, the early innings of this food revolution,” he said. “Nothing’s more important than what you put in your mouth three, four, five times a day.”




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    By Jessica Toonkel. The first mutual fund giving mom-and-pop investors easy access to the private market for tech startups turned a year old this week, capping a year of big gains and raising the question for would-be buyers: Is this a good deal or a danger?