DJIA: 17,751.39  +121.12 (0.69%) | NASDAQ: 5,111.733  +22.527 (0.44%) | S&P 500: 2,108.57  +15.32 (0.73%) Markets status unavailable

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    * Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs (GS), Berenberg to lead IPO - sources. * Flotation could value Hapag at more than 5 bln eur - Dow Jones. * IPO could take place as early as autumn - Dow Jones. By Arno Schuetze and Alexander Hübner.

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    German container shipping group Hapag-Lloyd is speeding up preparations for an initial public offering and has mandated Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs (GS) and Berenberg to lead the transaction, two people familiar with the matter said. Dow Jones earlier reported that an IPO could value the group at more than 5 billion euros and could take place as early as autumn.

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    Scarcity of shares are limiting gains, says J.P. Shares of Brazilian steakhouse chain Fogo de Chao (FOGO) stumbled Tuesday as the quiet period on the stock ended, allowing the underwriters of its June initial public offering to publish their first research. The end of the quiet period can act as a catalyst for a stock, if underwriters issue sufficiently glowing recommendations.

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    Seres Therapeutics (MCRB) continues to trade at a significant premium to its debut price after popping more than 40% on the Nasdaq in its first day of trading. The company is attracting investors looking to get a piece of a company that could be the first to bring a pharmaceutical based on microbiology to market.

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    Ahead of its initial public offering, the dating product provider The Match Group announced Tuesday that it has a definitive agreement to buy dating site PlentyOfFish for $575 million in cash. The Match Group is a subsidiary of IAC and includes Match, Tinder and OkCupid. IAC said at that the end of June that it would be seeking an initial public offering.

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    Thai refiner Star Petroleum Refining PCL could raise 20-25 billion baht in an initial public offering that would also mark the exit of energy firm PTT PCL (PUTRF), two people with knowledge of the deal said on Tuesday. At the top-end of the range, the IPO would be Thailand's second biggest this year after telecoms group Jasmine International PCL listed a $1.7 billion internet fund in February.

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    LONDON, July 14 (Reuters) - European stocks were seen opening steady on Tuesday, pausing after a strong four day rally, with investors unsure whether Greece would be able to get the support of its parliament behind a bailout deal designed to avert bankruptcy. Just hours after agreeing to an austerity package in return for agreeing to talks on an 86 billion euro bailout, doubts were already emerging about whether Tsipras would be able to hold his government together. The pan-European FTSEurofirst 300 index rose 1.9 percent to 1,572.05 points on Monday as markets welcomed the initial deal, rising for a fourth straight session. The euro zone's Euro STOXX 50 index hit a two-week high on Monday and has gained about 9 percent since last Tuesday's close. On Tuesday, futures for the Euro STOXX 50, Germany's DAX, France's CAAC and Britain's FTSE were flat to 0.3 percent higher ahead of the cash market open. COMPANY NEWS ENI, ENEL, ACEA, EDISON Italy's antitrust said on Monday it was investigating energy companies Acea, Eni, Enel and Edison after receiving numerous complaints about their invoicing methods. FIAT CHRYSLER AUTOMOBILES General Motors Co and the United Auto Workers on Monday kicked off bargaining that will determine labor costs for the U.S. operations of the Detroit Three, including Fiat Chrysler, with a show of harmony that extended to the blue, open-collar shirts worn by officials on each side. Healthcare packages and profit-sharing agreements could be revised in talks for new contracts between the UAW and the Big Three U.S. automakers, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing people familiar with the negotiations. EVONIK Private Equity firm CVC Capital Partners has sold about 15 million shares in Evonik for 34.60 euros ($38.05)apiece, JP Morgan, which is one of the bookrunners, said on Monday. ROCKET INTERNET The emerging markets e-commerce investor plans to sell 550 million euros worth of convertible bonds in a third round of financing just nine months after its initial public offering. KORIAN The French operator of care homes for the elderly said PSP Investments had acquired a 14 percent stake in the company. AEROPORTO BOLOGNA GUGLIELMO MARCONI Debuts on main segment Milan Stock Exchange. FCC Spanish builder FCC, whose top shareholder is Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim, said on Monday that it could accelerate the departure of CEO Juan Bejar if it finds a successor before Bejar is due to leave at the end of September. CORTE INGLES Privately owned Spanish department store chain El Corte Ingles has sold a 10 percent stake for 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) to Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Bin Jaber Al Thani, the former Prime Minister of Qatar, it said on Monday. ABENGOA Abengoa and Starwood Energy win a 114 mile transmission line in the southwest of the United States PROSEGUR Spanish security company Prosegur is considering listing about 30 percent of its cash-in-transit unit through an initial public offering in Madrid, Bloomberg reported on Monday, citing unnamed sources with knowledge of the matter. MAJOR MACROECONOMIC DATA/EVENTS (GMT) : 0600 DE CPI, HICP 0715 CH Producer/Import Price 0800 IT Consumer Prices, CPI 0830 GB CPI, RPI, PPI 0900 DE ZEW survey 0900 EZ Industrial production 1230 US Import/Export prices, Retail sales 1255 US Redbook 1400 US Business Inventories ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ MARKET SNAPSHOT AT 0524 GMT: LAST PCT CHG NET CHG S&P 500 2,099.60 1.11 % 22.98 NIKKEI 20337.46 1.23 % 247.69 MSCI ASIA EX-JP 460.79 0.02 % 0.09 EUR/USD 1.1 -0.02 % -0.0002 USD/JPY 123.29 -0.11 % -0.1300 10-YR US TSY YLD 2.432 -- 0.00 10-YR BUND YLD 0.850 -- 0.00 SPOT GOLD $1,155.20 -0.21 % -$2.40 US CRUDE $51.49 -1.36 % -0.71 > GLOBAL MARKETS-Asia shares up as Greek deal gets cautious nod > US STOCKS-Wall Street rallies on Greek deal; tech stocks jump > Nikkei climbs to 1-1/2-week high after Greece debt deal > TREASURIES-Yields rise on Greek deal, corporate bond sale weighs > FOREX-Dollar up with Greece off centre stage, safe-haven yen sags > PRECIOUS-Gold drops as focus shifts to looming U.S. rate hike > METALS-Copper holds steady after Greece deal, nickel sinks > Oil prices fall as Iran nuclear deal looks imminent (Reporting by Alistair Smout)

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    More than a 1,000 stocks remain suspended. From postponing initial public offerings to relaxing trading rules, Chinese authorities aggressively intervened to stabilize the stock market after panic sales shaved more than $3 trillion from the Shanghai Composite Index's market cap in a month. For now, the effort has paid off with the stock market regaining some of its composure, but analysts warned that the stabilization is likely to be a temporary victory, and that the worst may...

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    Spanish security company Prosegur is considering listing about 30 percent of its cash-in-transit unit through an initial public offering in Madrid, Bloomberg reported, citing unnamed sources with knowledge of the matter. Banks including Goldman Sachs (GS) and Bank of America (BAC) are working with Prosegur on the transaction, which could value the stake at 1 billion euros, Bloomberg said.

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    Company could be valued around $2 billion. Investment bank Houlihan Lokey Inc. has officially filed for an initial public offering. The company hasn't yet set the terms of the offering but said it expects to raise $100 million in common stock.

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    "I was just at KFC (YUM) eating chicken and looking at stocks, and a beggar came in with outstretched hands. I gave him a chicken wing to eat. He sat down beside me and spouted off some impressive advice about the long-term moving averages of KFC (YUM) and McDonald's (MCD). 'This stock is going to rise,' he predicted.I was shocked. 'You understand that?' I asked him.The beggar replied, 'If I didn’t know that, how would I have gotten where I am today?' "Many jokes like this one are now circulating on Sina Weibo (WB), China's version of Twitter, about the country's notoriously volatile stock markets. Chinese stock markets surged 200 percent over the last year, lost nearly one-third of their value in the last month, and then rebounded strongly in the last few days — leaving investors with a range of emotions including discouragement, suspicion and cautious optimism.The markets have been giving Chinese investors panic attacks all week, with Shanghai falling 5.9 percent on Wednesday before bouncing back up on Thursday and Friday. More than half of all stocks on the markets have been suspended to dampen investor panic.That sentiment was on display on Chinese social media sites. Users of the most popular services — Weibo (WB) and Tencent's WeChat, which is like a souped-up version of the American mobile chatting app WhatsApp — posted some positive comments after government measures boosted the markets on Thursday. However, many people also posted many wry jokes about the market and veiled criticism of the government.China blocks foreign social media sites like Twitter and Facebook (FB) inside its borders, a policy that has allowed its own domestic versions of the services to grow. The government censors posts on social media, but somewhat selectively. One study by researchers at Harvard University in 2013 found that censors typically allow some criticism of the government, instead focusing their efforts on posts that might incite collective actions, like riots, political organization or demonstrations. Another collection of deleted social media posts by the China Media Project shows that censors have recently focused on deleting posts that criticize government officials by name.Information from Freeweibo.com, a site created by an online activist group called GreatFire, shows that censors have been removing posts about the stock market from social media."Has Chinese-style financial crisis arrived?" asked one deleted post. "The Chinese stock market is too dirty," said another censored poster, who was retweeting an article on the differences between the Chinese and American stock markets. "Chinese IPOs need approval, U.S. IPOs do not ... in the long run, the U.S. market is an accelerator for wealth creation, innovation and entrepreneurship, while the Chinese market is the perfect mechanism for interest groups to repeatedly ransack investors' hard-earned money," the article says.The opinions on Chinese social media sites should be taken with a grain of salt — as on any social media site, posters may alter their identities or have hidden motivations. In addition, the Chinese government is widely known to sway public opinion by employing Internet commentators, a group that is popularly dubbed "the fifty cent party," after the payment they reportedly receive per post. But in general, social media still provides an informative window into public opinion in a country where commentary is highly censored.Many of the most popular posts about the stock market were jokes — though some hit a little too close to home to be that funny. For example, this one, which describes the experience of some people who have found stocks to be a more profitable activity than working in China's slowing economy:“When the economy is doing well, the stock market drops. When the economy is doing poorly, the stock market shoots up. It seems like when the economy is doing well, we all go to work and earn money. When the economy is doing poorly, we all gather in the village entrance to gamble,” the post says.Chinese state media, waving the red flagThe market's bull run seems partly to be a product of government intention — the government changed regulations to allow investors to buy stocks with borrowed money and open multiple accounts in the last year. It's also partly a product of bigger economic trends — the property market, where Chinese traditionally store their wealth, slumped in the last year, leaving people eager for other profitable investments. And it's partially a product of mass psychology, with many new investors piling into the market to avoid being left out.A survey last year showed that that two-thirds of Chinese investors haven’t completed high school, and many people still trade on tips and rumors gathered from friends and neighbors. In Shanghai, for example, thousands of people are gathering at street stock market salons from the early afternoon until late in the evening to exchange tips and information, according to domestic media.Since share values began to fall in mid-June, the Chinese government has jumped in repeatedly to rescue the market, cutting interest rates, pausing initial public offerings, and allowing pension funds to invest more in stocks, among other measures. It also used a state-owned company to lend $42 billion to 21 brokerages so they could purchase blue-chip stocks.And the government sent out many rah-rah messages about the stock market through China's state-owned media. State media also reported that the government had launched an investigation into cases of people "maliciously" shorting blue-chip stocks.Not all media in China are state-owned; some are private. But all media companies occasionally receive directives from China's propaganda ministry on what they should and should not publish. The state-owned media companies, including People's Daily, China Daily and Global Times, are viewed as direct mouthpieces of the government.State media played a prominent role in stoking the stock market bubble in the first place. As David Wertime of Foreign Policy notes, Xinhua (XHFNF) published eight articles on the stock market in a space of three days in early September, and in March, People’s Daily issued a three-article series, “A Share Volatility [Is Part of] a Slow Bull; [Index] Expected to Challenge 4,000.”Directing the stock market may seem like an odd role for official media, but Barry Naughton, a professor of international relations at the University of California at San Diego, explains that it is a product of state media's desire to support the administration of Xi Jinping, the president of China and the secretary of the Communist Party."Chinese official publications definitely applauded the run-up to the stock market, and they were allowed to portray it as one of the channels that was contributing to greater wealth and to Xi Jinping’s China Dream," says Naughton, referring to Xi's plan to restore China to its historical wealth and glory.Naughton says Xi's administration has been marked by a deep bifurcation — pursuing some serious economic reforms, while also, at the same time, giving the propaganda and public security apparatus "full license to recreate some of the worst aspects of the Communist Party system.""That was incredibly irresponsible. It fueled the bubble at the worst time," he says. "And it meant that the regime was on the hook: When things started to correct, there was a sense among the political leaders that this is really bad, not just for the pure economic reasons, but because it presented a challenge to the official narrative of Xi Jinping’s being the face of a new, more successful and more confident China."A few voices at state-run media have been more critical: "Government cannot be market's babysitter," read an opinion piece in the state-run newspaper Global Times on July 4 that concluded "The future of China's stock market lies in further marketization, not a 'policy bull.' "But the majority have cheered the stock market rally on.“The national team is strong and powerful, and the government’s determination to maintain financial stability is firm,” said another commentary piece in Global Times entitled, “The national team will certainly win”:“Pessimism about the future is uncalled for,” cautioned another piece from the state-run Xinhua News Agency. "After rain and storms, rainbows appear," said an editorial by the People's Daily. On Friday, following a recovery in the market, China's Securities Times, the official paper of the securities regulator, carried reports from five major brokers claiming that the big stock market panic is over and that markets are set to rebound.Some Chinese responded on social media by calling on each other to keep buying stocks to save the market and the economy.But others seemed much more concerned about their life savings.The country "robbed 10 yuan from you and then returned 5. In the end you still said, 'I firmly believe in the country.' I can only laugh hollowly," one social media user said. "Investing in this market is like gambling in Macao," said another, referring to the city in China where gambling is legal.Others criticized the market through quips and jokes.“A person walks into a bookstore and says to the seller: “I want to buy a book with no killers, but a lot of bloodshed; with no love, but much regret; with no spies, but constant paranoia,” one joke goes.The bookseller says, “We just have the Chinese stock market.”Gu Jinglu in Beijing contributed to this article.






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    "I was just at KFC (YUM) eating chicken and looking at stocks, and a beggar came in with outstretched hands. I gave him a chicken wing to eat. He sat down beside me and spouted off some impressive advice about the long-term moving averages of KFC (YUM) and McDonald's (MCD). 'This stock is going to rise,' he predicted.I was shocked. 'You understand that?' I asked him.The beggar replied, 'If I didn’t know that, how would I have gotten where I am today?' "Many jokes like this one are now circulating on Sina Weibo (WB), China's version of Twitter, about the country's notoriously volatile stock markets. Chinese stock markets surged 200 percent over the last year, lost nearly one-third of their value in the last month, and then rebounded strongly in the last few days — leaving investors with a range of emotions including discouragement, suspicion and cautious optimism.The markets have been giving Chinese investors panic attacks all week, with Shanghai falling 5.9 percent on Wednesday before bouncing back up on Thursday and Friday. More than half of all stocks on the markets have been suspended to dampen investor panic.That sentiment was on display on Chinese social media sites. Users of the most popular services — Weibo (WB) and Tencent's WeChat, which is like a souped-up version of the American mobile chatting app WhatsApp — posted some positive comments after government measures boosted the markets on Thursday. However, many people also posted many wry jokes about the market and veiled criticism of the government.China blocks foreign social media sites like Twitter and Facebook (FB) inside its borders, a policy that has allowed its own domestic versions of the services to grow. The government censors posts on social media, but somewhat selectively. One study by researchers at Harvard University in 2013 found that censors typically allow some criticism of the government, instead focusing their efforts on posts that might incite collective actions, like riots, political organization or demonstrations. Another collection of deleted social media posts by the China Media Project shows that censors have recently focused on deleting posts that criticize government officials by name.Information from Freeweibo.com, a site created by an online activist group called GreatFire, shows that censors have been removing posts about the stock market from social media."Has Chinese-style financial crisis arrived?" asked one deleted post. "The Chinese stock market is too dirty," said another censored poster, who was retweeting an article on the differences between the Chinese and American stock markets. "Chinese IPOs need approval, U.S. IPOs do not ... in the long run, the U.S. market is an accelerator for wealth creation, innovation and entrepreneurship, while the Chinese market is the perfect mechanism for interest groups to repeatedly ransack investors' hard-earned money," the article says.The opinions on Chinese social media sites should be taken with a grain of salt — as on any social media site, posters may alter their identities or have hidden motivations. In addition, the Chinese government is widely known to sway public opinion by employing Internet commentators, a group that is popularly dubbed "the fifty cent party," after the payment they reportedly receive per post. But in general, social media still provides an informative window into public opinion in a country where commentary is highly censored.Many of the most popular posts about the stock market were jokes — though some hit a little too close to home to be that funny. For example, this one, which describes the experience of some people who have found stocks to be a more profitable activity than working in China's slowing economy:“When the economy is doing well, the stock market drops. When the economy is doing poorly, the stock market shoots up. It seems like when the economy is doing well, we all go to work and earn money. When the economy is doing poorly, we all gather in the village entrance to gamble,” the post says.Chinese state media, waving the red flagThe market's bull run seems partly to be a product of government intention — the government changed regulations to allow investors to buy stocks with borrowed money and open multiple accounts in the last year. It's also partly a product of bigger economic trends — the property market, where Chinese traditionally store their wealth, slumped in the last year, leaving people eager for other profitable investments. And it's partially a product of mass psychology, with many new investors piling into the market to avoid being left out.A survey last year showed that that two-thirds of Chinese investors haven’t completed high school, and many people still trade on tips and rumors gathered from friends and neighbors. In Shanghai, for example, thousands of people are gathering at street stock market salons from the early afternoon until late in the evening to exchange tips and information, according to domestic media.Since share values began to fall in mid-June, the Chinese government has jumped in repeatedly to rescue the market, cutting interest rates, pausing initial public offerings, and allowing pension funds to invest more in stocks, among other measures. It also used a state-owned company to lend $42 billion to 21 brokerages so they could purchase blue-chip stocks.And the government sent out many rah-rah messages about the stock market through China's state-owned media. State media also reported that the government had launched an investigation into cases of people "maliciously" shorting blue-chip stocks.Not all media in China are state-owned; some are private. But all media companies occasionally receive directives from China's propaganda ministry on what they should and should not publish. The state-owned media companies, including People's Daily, China Daily and Global Times, are viewed as direct mouthpieces of the government.State media played a prominent role in stoking the stock market bubble in the first place. As David Wertime of Foreign Policy notes, Xinhua (XHFNF) published eight articles on the stock market in a space of three days in early September, and in March, People’s Daily issued a three-article series, “A Share Volatility [Is Part of] a Slow Bull; [Index] Expected to Challenge 4,000.”Directing the stock market may seem like an odd role for official media, but Barry Naughton, a professor of international relations at the University of California at San Diego, explains that it is a product of state media's desire to support the administration of Xi Jinping, the president of China and the secretary of the Communist Party."Chinese official publications definitely applauded the run-up to the stock market, and they were allowed to portray it as one of the channels that was contributing to greater wealth and to Xi Jinping’s China Dream," says Naughton, referring to Xi's plan to restore China to its historical wealth and glory.Naughton says Xi's administration has been marked by a deep bifurcation — pursuing some serious economic reforms, while also, at the same time, giving the propaganda and public security apparatus "full license to recreate some of the worst aspects of the Communist Party system.""That was incredibly irresponsible. It fueled the bubble at the worst time," he says. "And it meant that the regime was on the hook: When things started to correct, there was a sense among the political leaders that this is really bad, not just for the pure economic reasons, but because it presented a challenge to the official narrative of Xi Jinping’s being the face of a new, more successful and more confident China."A few voices at state-run media have been more critical: "Government cannot be market's babysitter," read an opinion piece in the state-run newspaper Global Times on July 4 that concluded "The future of China's stock market lies in further marketization, not a 'policy bull.' "But the majority have cheered the stock market rally on.“The national team is strong and powerful, and the government’s determination to maintain financial stability is firm,” said another commentary piece in Global Times entitled, “The national team will certainly win”:“Pessimism about the future is uncalled for,” cautioned another piece from the state-run Xinhua News Agency. "After rain and storms, rainbows appear," said an editorial by the People's Daily. On Friday, following a recovery in the market, China's Securities Times, the official paper of the securities regulator, carried reports from five major brokers claiming that the big stock market panic is over and that markets are set to rebound.Some Chinese responded on social media by calling on each other to keep buying stocks to save the market and the economy.But others seemed much more concerned about their life savings.The country "robbed 10 yuan from you and then returned 5. In the end you still said, 'I firmly believe in the country.' I can only laugh hollowly," one social media user said. "Investing in this market is like gambling in Macao," said another, referring to the city in China where gambling is legal.Others criticized the market through quips and jokes.“A person walks into a bookstore and says to the seller: “I want to buy a book with no killers, but a lot of bloodshed; with no love, but much regret; with no spies, but constant paranoia,” one joke goes.The bookseller says, “We just have the Chinese stock market.”Gu Jinglu in Beijing contributed to this article.






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    NEW YORK — Wondering how to get in on the planned Albertsons IPO before it goes public? The New Hyde Park, N.Y. real estate investment trust is part of a consortium led by private equity shop Cerberus Capital Management LP that has been snapping up Albertsons stores for the past decade.

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    NEW YORK — From Facebook  to Fitbit (FIT), many novice investors get excited about the opportunity to invest in companies they know and love. What is an IPO? Private companies looking to expand their business can raise cash quickly by selling stock to the general public. To Invest in an IPO or Not. Before making a trade, find out what you’re buying. Do Your Homework.

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    Mexican construction conglomerate Elementia, part owned by billionaire Carlos Slim, soared as much as 10.5 percent on its Friday debut on the Mexican stock exchange after the shares were priced below the preliminary target range. Early on Friday, Elementia priced its initial public offering at 17 pesos per share, below the 20-25 peso range proposed in a preliminary prospectus last month.

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    Shares of Mexican construction conglomerate Elementia, part-owned by billionaire Carlos Slim, rose more than 7 percent to 18.3 pesos per share in their debut on Mexico's stock exchange in early trading on Friday. The company announced earlier on Friday it had priced its initial public offering at 17 pesos per share, below the range it had originally proposed.