DJIA: 16,643.01  -11.76 (-0.07%) | NASDAQ: 4,828.325  +15.616 (0.32%) | S&P 500: 1,988.87  +1.21 (0.06%) Markets status unavailable

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    * CSI300 +1.5 pct; SSEC +1.9 pct; HSI +0.5 pct. * Banking shares fall after lacklustre performance at top lenders. * Some analysts question sustainability of the rebound. China stocks rose on Friday, encouraged by strong gains on Wall Street and signs of fresh support from Beijing after a five-day plunge that panicked global markets.

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    Japanese government bond prices were little changed on Friday, with the negative impact from rallying Tokyo shares and an overnight retreat by U.S. Treasuries offset by the Bank of Japan's regular debt buying. The benchmark 10-year JGB yield was unchanged at 0.385 percent and the 20-year yield edged down half a basis point to 1.150 percent.

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    Copper edged down in Asian trading on Friday following strong gains overnight, but traders said the metal remained underpinned by a second day of resurgent Asian equities and higher oil prices. "The sentiment out there is still positive and that's keeping copper up today," a Perth-based commodities trader.

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    * Nikkei trades above 200-day moving average. * Nikkei still down 2.1 percent this week. * Short-selling ratio hit record high on Thurs. By Ayai Tomisawa. Japan's Nikkei share average surged more than 2 percent on Friday, helped by further gains on Wall Street after strong U.S. economic data buoyed sentiment that had been shaken by fears of a China-led global economic slowdown.

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    Shares of NQ Mobile (NQ), which sells mobile Internet services in China, soared by 38.6% on Thursday, closing at $4.20 on the New York Stock Exchange. The company, headquartered in Beijing, provides mobile security and cloud services. On Wednesday the company announced a 25% increase in quarterly net revenue for the period ending June 30, compared with the same three months of 2014.

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    The dollar held at one-week highs against a basket of major currencies early on Friday, having benefited from upbeat U.S. data and as investors continued to cut back on safe-havens such as the yen. Commodity currencies including the Australian dollar managed to outperform their U.S. peer after a solid rebound in Chinese equities helped lift risk appetite generally.

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    * TSX up 385.08 points, or 2.88 percent, at 13,766.67. * All of the TSX's 10 main groups rose. By Solarina Ho. Canada's main stock index jumped nearly 3 percent on Thursday, recouping this week's hefty losses, as a 10 percent surge in crude oil prices fueled a rally in energy shares and helped lead an across-the-board bounce.

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    * Canadian dollar at C$1.3218, or 75.65 U.S. cents * Bond prices mostly higher across the maturity curve By Solarina Ho TORONTO, Aug 27 - The Canadian dollar firmed against its U.S. counterpart on Thursday, as crude prices soared more than 10 percent following a global equities rally and an unexpected drop in U.S. oil inventories.

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    To believe that the latest stock market correction is largely over and that the market is truly on its way to extending the 6- year-old bull market, one must see the glass half-full, rather than half-empty. Mostly, it comes down to how investors interpret economic data, interest rates, monetary policy, valuations, and impact of slowing growth in China. See: Here's why the stock-market correction isn't over.

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    Shares of Baidu (BIDU) are rising by 5.58% to $150.35 in mid-day trading on Thursday, as some U.S. traded China-based stocks rally along with China's market. On Monday, the steep decline in the Shanghai Composite Index caused a global sell-off, but today the index closed higher by 5.3%. It's largest one-day gain in eight weeks, USA Today reports.

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    SAO PAULO, Aug 27 (Reuters) - Latin American financial markets rallied on Thursday on bets the Federal Reserve will delay an expected increase in U.S. interest rates to avoid further market turmoil, despite signs that the U.S. economy was steadily growing. MSCI's benchmark stock index for the region jumped 5.4 percent, on track to post its largest one-day gain in nearly four years, after data showed the U.S. economy grew considerably more than expected in the second quarter. A separate report showing fewer claims for U.S. unemployment benefits further brightened the economic picture. Despite the positive data, investors kept their bets that the Fed will refrain from raising rates next month as policymakers try not to add to the recent market turmoil fueled by concerns over the Chinese economy. Latin American currencies strengthened as a result, with the Brazilian real and the Mexican peso gaining 1.6 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively. Key Latin American stock indexes and currencies at 1755 GMT: Stock Indexes Latest Daily YTD pct pct change change MSCI Emerging Markets 814.19 3.42 -17.67 MSCI LatAm 2,085.68 5.15 -27.28 Brazil Bovespa 47,569.88 3.33 -4.87 Mexico IPC 43,353.28 2.43 0.48 Chile IPSA 3,800.14 3.34 -1.32 Chile IGPA 18,532.54 2.88 -1.79 Argentina MerVal 10,891.21 5.84 26.95 Colombia IGBC 9,220.19 3.68 -20.75 Venezuela IBC 14,895.14 -0.2 286.01 Currencies Daily YTD pct pct change Latest change Brazil real 3.5514 1.35 -25.17 Mexico peso 16.835 1.16 -12.42 Chile peso 693.5 1.91 -12.56 Colombia peso 3,172 2.77 -24.72 Peru sol 3.2731 0.96 -8.99 Argentina peso 9.2825 -0.05 -7.89 (interbank) Argentina peso (parallel) 15.58 2.18 -10.14 (Reporting by Walter Brandimarte; Editing by James Dalgleish)

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    Turmoil in the stock market drove mortgage rates lower this week, sending the 30-year fixed-rate average down to its lowest level in three months. According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac (FMCC), the 30-year fixed-rate average dropped to 3.84 percent with an average 0.6 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1 percent of the loan amount.) It was 3.93 percent a week ago and 4.1 percent a year ago. The 30-year fixed rate hasn’t been this low since the week of May 21. It has remained below 4 percent for five weeks.The 15-year fixed-rate average sank to 3.06 percent with an average 0.6 point. It was 3.15 percent a week ago and 3.25 percent a year ago.[How borrowers can help make the mortgage application process go smoother]Hybrid adjustable rate mortgages were mostly flat. The five-year ARM average fell to 2.9 percent with an average 0.4 point. It was 2.94 percent a week ago and 2.97 percent a year ago.The one-year ARM average was unchanged from last week, holding steady at 2.62 percent with an average 0.3 point.“Events in China generated eye-catching volatility in equity markets worldwide over the past week,” Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac (FMCC) chief economist, said in a statement.“Interest rates also rocked up and down — although to a lesser extent than equities — as investors alternated between flights to quality and bargain hunting among beaten-down stocks. …“Given the recent volatility, mortgage rates could change up or down significantly by the time this report is released. There are indications though that the unsettled state of global markets will make the Fed think twice before taking any action on short-term interest rates in September.  If that’s the case, the 30-year mortgage rate may remain subdued in the short-to-medium term, providing support for continued strength in the housing sector. Just this week, new home sales were reported to be up 26 percent year over year.”[Global market chaos throws Federal Reserve’s rate hike plan into doubt]Meanwhile, mortgage applications were flat, according to the latest data from the Mortgage Bankers Association.The market composite index — a measure of total loan application volume — crept up 0.2 percent from the previous week. The refinance index slid 1 percent, while the purchase index increased 2 percent.The refinance share of mortgage activity accounted for 55.3 percent of all applications.






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    All sectors on Stoxx Europe 600 gain. European stocks jumped Thursday, as a bigger-than-expected revision in U.S. economic activity brightened prospects for global growth. The Stoxx Europe 600 climbed 12.13 points, or 3.5%, to 362.27.

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    Stocks in the U.K. ended sharply higher Thursday as shares of commodity producers lead a rally that's helped the benchmark FTSE 100 to recover from a sharp selloff at the start of the week. The FTSE 100 jumped 212.83 points, or 3.6%, to 6,192.03, marking the biggest percentage gain since October 2011, FactSet data show. The move pushed the blue-chips index slightly above where it stood before Monday's rout, spurred by worries about slowing growth in China.

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    The Chinese dragon is breathing a lot less fire these days, and the plunge in that nation's stocks over the past several sessions has been brutal for investors. But it should hardly come as a surprise. That doesn't mean gloom and doom for everyone, everywhere. Passive investment -- through vehicles like exchange-traded funds -- makes sense in plenty of market environments.

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    Sterling' caught in the crossfire' between the euro and the dollar. The British pound broke through several widely watched technical indicators Thursday on the way to a seven-week low, an incredible reversal from its highs earlier in the week, currency strategists said. On Tuesday, the British currency rose to $1.5820, its highest level against the dollar since late June.

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    * TSX up 338.97 points, or 2.53 percent, at 13,720.56. * All of the TSX's 10 main groups rose. By Solarina Ho. Canada's main stock index jumped more than 2 percent on Thursday, recouping this week's hefty losses, as a surge in crude prices fueled a rally in energy shares and helped lead an across-the-board bounce.

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    This week has been a chaotic one on Wall Street and in stock markets from Shenzen to Amsterdam. For most investors, though, one little index card is all you need to get through the turmoil.A couple of years ago, University of Chicago social scientist Harold Pollack fit a complete guide to financial planning on this four-inch-by-six-inch piece of cardstock, which we shared with readers. It's comprehensive and easy to understand, if not always easy to follow: saving money is difficult when you don't have much, and in a panic like Monday's sell-off, the temptation to deviate from the principles on the card can be strong.But if you've followed the advice on the card and invested in diversified index funds with minimal fees with an appropriate level of risk for your age, you can confidently hold onto your investments through days like these, without worrying about whether you should buy or sell.The card proved enormously popular, and Pollack and journalist Helaine Olen are coming out with a book based on it in January -- "which is sort of funny," Pollack said in an interview Wednesday. "The whole concept is the index card."Still, there are a couple of points on the card that take a little explaining.Pollack does not recommend that a typical household invest in stock in any particular company. The person selling the stock probably knows more about the company than your average retail investor, so the chances of getting a bad deal are high. That's especially the case at a time like this week, when prices are fluctuating wildly and predicting is difficult, even for those who really know the market.Instead, Pollack says you should buy mutual funds, but not just any mutual funds. Some funds have a manager who monitors the stock market and buys and sells stocks -- the "actively managed funds" described on the card. Other funds hold a broad range of securities of a specific type, such as stocks and bonds. Even though these funds don't have someone keeping an eye on them all the time, they usually do just as well as the actively managed funds, and the fees are less expensive.The card instructs investors to buy target-date funds -- funds that are designed to be bought and held until a particular date, sometimes decades in the future. These funds help investors plan for retirement or for sending a child to college, and they're invested in a large number of stocks and bonds with the right amount of risk for the amount of time they're supposed to be held. Funds with dates farther in the future can take on more risk, since there is more time to make up the losses from any crash.Pollack says that the book won't include the recommendation to invest in target funds. Some of these funds have expensive fees, and many investors defeat the purpose of a target fund by buying other assets alongside the target fund, which defeats the purpose of the fund by adding in other risks.Pollack is also making changes to the advice on the card when it comes to saving. According to the card, you should pay off your credit card balance in full every month and maximize any matched savings from your employer. The card also has this: "Save 20 percent of your money." That's a good goal, Pollack says, but it simply isn't realistic for many families.The final two points on the card are political. The Obama administration has recently proposed requiring more brokers to adhere to the fiduciary standard, which means that legally, they must act in your best interest. The financial industry is opposed to the plan -- they argue that implementing it would make getting financial advice too expensive. Yet Pollack says it's worth paying the extra money for someone who will acknowledge a fiduciary duty to you.And lastly, Pollack advises, "Promote social insurance programs to help people when things go wrong." In other words, he argues, it's not enough just to take care of your own finances. You should also give your support to programs such as Social Security, Medicaid, and food stamps to help other people get by as well.Lots of people have told Pollack he shouldn't use up any of those precious 24 square inches with political opinions, but he's not taking that line off the card.When Pollack's mother in law died, he and his wife had to care for his intellectually disabled brother in law, which would have been financially impossible if his wife's brother hadn't qualified as a survivor for Social Security and Medicare."Boy, we needed that money," Pollack said. "I have to pay that forward."In other words, even the savviest investors find themselves in situations where they are relying on checks from the government to get by. If Pollack didn't acknowledge as much on his card, he wouldn't be giving honest advice.