DJIA: 17,730.11  -27.80 (-0.16%) | NASDAQ: 5,009.214  0.00 (0.00%) | S&P 500: 2,076.78  -0.64 (-0.03%) Markets status unavailable

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    * IMF warns Greece needs debt extension. * June nonfarm payrolls increase less than expected. * Average hourly earnings unchanged. * Six of the 10 S&P sectors down. * Indexes down: Dow 0.12 pct, S&P 0.09 pct, Nasdaq 0.27 pct. By Sweta Singh.

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    * Downward revisions in job increases, no wage growth in June raise concerns * Uncertainty over Greece's referendum spur bids for bonds * Futures suggest traders price out Fed rate hike in 2015 * Some analysts see Sept rate increase still in play By Richard Leong NEW YORK, July 2 - U.S. Treasuries prices rose on Thursday as data showed a setback in labor market improvement in June, raising doub...

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    * S&P/TSX index up 45.77 points, 0.31 pct, at 14,599.1. * Valeant rises 2.41 percent to C$283.76. Canada's main stock index rose modestly on Thursday as investors pushed into healthcare shares and other defensive sectors, offsetting weakness in commodity-sensitive stocks. Rattled by the Greek crisis, the TSX index has given up the gains it made earlier in the year.

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    * June nonfarm payrolls increase less than expected. * Average hourly earnings unchanged. * Eight of the 10 S&P sectors up. * Indexes up: Dow 0.22 pct, S&P 0.23 pct, Nasdaq 0.04 pct. By Sweta Singh. U.S. stocks rose on Thursday after data showed job growth slowed in June, indicating that the U.S. Federal Reserve might hold off on raising interest rates in September.

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    * Uncertainty over Greece's referendum spur bids for bonds * Futures suggest traders price out Fed rate hike in 2015 By Richard Leong NEW YORK, July 2 - U.S. Treasuries prices rose on Thursday as data showed a setback in labor market improvement in June, raising doubts whether the Federal Reserve would end its near-zero interest rate policy later this year.

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    U.S. stocks opened higher on Thursday after data showed smaller-than-expected growth in U.S. jobs, reducing chances of an interest rate hike in September. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 42.35 points, or 0.24 percent, to 17,800.26, the S&P 500 gained 5.49 points, or 0.26 percent, to 2,082.91 and the Nasdaq Composite added 12.64 points, or 0.25 percent, to 5,025.76.

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     Xoom shares are up 21.21% to $25.09 in pre-market trading on Thursday after online money transfer service PayPal acquired the digital money transfer company for $890 million.Xoom has 1.3 million customers spread across 37 different countries and allows its users to transfer money online through smartphones, tablets and desktops.Xoom will operate as a separate entity outside of PayPal once the ...

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    * June nonfarm payrolls increase less than expected. * Average hourly earnings unchanged. * Futures up: Dow 40 pts; S&P 4.5 pts; Nasdaq 12 pts. By Sweta Singh. Wall Street was set to open higher on Thursday after data showed labor market weakened in June, indicating that the U.S. Federal Reserve could hold off on raising interest rates in September.

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    U.S. Treasuries prices turned higher on Friday, erasing earlier losses, as domestic payrolls data in June fell short of forecast in June, reducing bets the Federal Reserve would increase interest rates this year. The U.S. Labor Department said U.S. employers added 223,000 workers last month, less than the 230,000 increase projected by economists polled by Reuters.

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    U.S. stock futures extended their gains on Thursday after data showed U.S. job growth slowed in June, dampening expectations of an interest rate hike in September. Futures snapshot at 8:32 a.m. EDT: * S&P 500 e-minis were up 5 points, or 0.24 percent, with 150,107 contracts traded. * Nasdaq 100 e-minis were up 11.75 points, or 0.27 percent, on volume of 27,604 contracts.

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    - U.S. stocks closed down slightly on Thursday after the International Monetary Fund warned Greece ahead of its Sunday referendum that it faces a huge financial hole, and mixed jobs data dampened the U.S. economic outlook.

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    * Futures up: Dow 21 pts, S&P 2.25 pts, Nasdaq 6 pts. U.S. stock index futures rose slightly on Thursday ahead of a critical job report that could feed into the U.S. Federal Reserve's decision on when to increase interest rates. * Non-farm payrolls are expected to have increased by 230,000 in June, with the unemployment rate declining to 5.4 percent from 5.5 percent.

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    he Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority paid all principal and interest due to bondholders on Wednesday, buying the troubled utility time as it works to reach a deal with creditors. The authority, also known as Prepa, said in a statement that it is funding the $415 million payment with about $153 million from its general fund and the rest from its debt-service reserves. Insurers that protect some of Prepa's bonds agreed to buy $128 million in new short-term debt due by mid-December.

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    Updated from 7:07 a.m. Here are 10 things you should know for Thursday, July 2: 1. -- U.S. stock futures were rising modestly as investors maintained hope for a Greek debt deal and prepared to kick off for the July 4 holiday. European stocks were flat as Greece continued to dominate market considerations.

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    Some stocks should be avoided regardless of how cheap they may appear. In Micron, Alcoa (AA) and ExOne (XONE), investors have three stocks that have been left for dead but that can become swans in the second half of 2015. Not only have these first-half ugly duckling stocks lost at least 25% of their value so far in 2015, they are also trading at their 52-week lows.

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    The following Spanish stocks may be affected by newspaper reports and other factors on Thursday. AMADEUS. Spanish travel technology company Amadeus said it would buy Navitaire, a subsidiary of Accenture Plc, for $830 million, to focus mainly on digital services for airline passengers. GAMESA.

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    Not even a default by a rich European nation could knock stock markets off track for long.A day after Greece missed a critical debt payment to the International Monetary Fund, markets were back in the green Wednesday, gaining back significant ground after the sell-off earlier this week. European markets were broadly up 2 percent, while Asian markets surged with the exception of China. At home, the Dow Jones industrial average climbed 138 points to end up 0.8 percent at 17,758.The response was the latest example of the resiliency of stock markets ever since they bottomed out in 2009 as banks collapsed, profits dried up and corporations slashed costs. Households watched their 401(k) balances shrivel, and forecasters feared an entire generation of wealth would be lost.Instead, stock markets have been on a seemingly unstoppable rally. Key indexes have doubled in value or more, even as the world economy logs disappointing growth year after year.The question, however, is whether financial markets are out of sync with economic fundamentals and fail to reflect vulnerabilities, like the risk of Greece’s default sparking a panic. If so, some investors worry that heralds a potentially painful adjustment down the road.“Stocks are richly valued relative to history,” said Matthew Coffina, editor and portfolio manager of Morningstar StockInvestor. “I wouldn’t say that the market is guaranteed or destined to crash right now, but I would say the history is not encouraging.”The global economy grew by a middling 2.6 percent last year, according to the International Monetary Fund, about the same rate of expansion as the previous two years. This year, growth is expected to clock in at a modestly higher 2.8 percent. But the 3 to 4 percent growth enjoyed before the global recession remains elusive.The reasons behind such lackluster growth are many and varied. Many European countries enacted severe government spending cuts to control ballooning debt. Japan is battling a deflationary cycle that has lasted 20 years. In the United States, economists have pointed to a shrinking labor force and an overhang of household debt.Yet all of these economies have relied on one main tool to boost growth: easy money.The central banks in the United States, England, Europe and Japan, along with those in several smaller countries, have slashed their benchmark interest rates to zero and pumped money into their economies. Their ultimate goal has been to boost growth by making borrowing extremely cheap, which in turn prompts consumers to spend and businesses to invest.But ultra-low interest rates more directly impact financial markets. Easy money encourages investors to take bigger risks, driving a run-up in equities.Since the U.S. Federal Reserve announced an open-ended stimulus plan in late 2012, the blue-chip Dow Jones industrial average has hit a new high nearly 100 times. It averaged a new record once a week during 2013. The European Central Bank unveiled a similar program early this year, sending markets there up by double digits. The Nikkei index has doubled in value in recent years amid aggressive stimulus from the Bank of Japan, yet the country suffered a recession in 2014.“I don’t think we’re in bubble territory or anything like that, but I think that monetary policy is doing its work,” said Paul Sheard, chief global economist at Standard & Poor’s.The one exception, analysts agree, could certainly be China. The Shanghai Composite Index is one of the best-performing in the world, doubling in value over the past year. Chinese officials have targeted an annual economic growth rate of 7 percent, but the country’s breakneck expansion has slowed considerably and is expected to come in just shy of that goal this year. The People’s Bank of China (BACHF) has slashed its benchmark rate to a record low over the weekend as markets swung wildly over the past few days. The Shanghai Composite plummeted 5­ percent at the end of Wednesday’s trading session after gaining a similar amount the day beforeSome analysts worried the turmoil in Greece could be the catalyst for a correction not only in Europe but around the world. The breakdown in negotiations over a bailout plan could wind up forcing Greece to drop the currency it shares with 18 other European countries and destabilize the entire region. It is unclear how the drama in Greece will affect markets. Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has called a referendum for Sunday that puts the future of any deal in voters’ hands. “Sure this is going to have long-run implications, but the near term the reaction in the Spanish or Portugese or Italian markets has been relatively muted,” said Desmond Lachman, resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. “It’s right for markets not to be panicking.”Still, all but the most bearish investors stop short of declaring that markets are in a bubble. Global growth may still be weak, but it has picked up in recent years. And a strong stock market can feed back into the economy through increased investor wealth and spending.Perhaps the biggest test of the rally’s strength could come later this year. The Fed expects it will raise its benchmark interest rate for the first time in nearly a decade, which would make it the first major central bank to begin backing off its easy money stance. Investors are nervous that an increase in rates could shift the dynamic of the markets.“Stock prices don’t always follow economic fundamentals,” Coffina said. “It works in both directions.”