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    Updated from 7:07 a.m. Here are 10 things you should know for Thursday, July 2: 1. -- U.S. stock futures were rising modestly as investors maintained hope for a Greek debt deal and prepared to kick off for the July 4 holiday. European stocks were flat as Greece continued to dominate market considerations.

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    Some stocks should be avoided regardless of how cheap they may appear. In Micron, Alcoa (AA) and ExOne (XONE), investors have three stocks that have been left for dead but that can become swans in the second half of 2015. Not only have these first-half ugly duckling stocks lost at least 25% of their value so far in 2015, they are also trading at their 52-week lows.

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    The following Spanish stocks may be affected by newspaper reports and other factors on Thursday. AMADEUS. Spanish travel technology company Amadeus said it would buy Navitaire, a subsidiary of Accenture Plc, for $830 million, to focus mainly on digital services for airline passengers. GAMESA.

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    Not even a default by a rich European nation could knock stock markets off track for long.A day after Greece missed a critical debt payment to the International Monetary Fund, markets were back in the green Wednesday, gaining back significant ground after the sell-off earlier this week. European markets were broadly up 2 percent, while Asian markets surged with the exception of China. At home, the Dow Jones industrial average climbed 138 points to end up 0.8 percent at 17,758.The response was the latest example of the resiliency of stock markets ever since they bottomed out in 2009 as banks collapsed, profits dried up and corporations slashed costs. Households watched their 401(k) balances shrivel, and forecasters feared an entire generation of wealth would be lost.Instead, stock markets have been on a seemingly unstoppable rally. Key indexes have doubled in value or more, even as the world economy logs disappointing growth year after year.The question, however, is whether financial markets are out of sync with economic fundamentals and fail to reflect vulnerabilities, like the risk of Greece’s default sparking a panic. If so, some investors worry that heralds a potentially painful adjustment down the road.“Stocks are richly valued relative to history,” said Matthew Coffina, editor and portfolio manager of Morningstar StockInvestor. “I wouldn’t say that the market is guaranteed or destined to crash right now, but I would say the history is not encouraging.”The global economy grew by a middling 2.6 percent last year, according to the International Monetary Fund, about the same rate of expansion as the previous two years. This year, growth is expected to clock in at a modestly higher 2.8 percent. But the 3 to 4 percent growth enjoyed before the global recession remains elusive.The reasons behind such lackluster growth are many and varied. Many European countries enacted severe government spending cuts to control ballooning debt. Japan is battling a deflationary cycle that has lasted 20 years. In the United States, economists have pointed to a shrinking labor force and an overhang of household debt.Yet all of these economies have relied on one main tool to boost growth: easy money.The central banks in the United States, England, Europe and Japan, along with those in several smaller countries, have slashed their benchmark interest rates to zero and pumped money into their economies. Their ultimate goal has been to boost growth by making borrowing extremely cheap, which in turn prompts consumers to spend and businesses to invest.But ultra-low interest rates more directly impact financial markets. Easy money encourages investors to take bigger risks, driving a run-up in equities.Since the U.S. Federal Reserve announced an open-ended stimulus plan in late 2012, the blue-chip Dow Jones industrial average has hit a new high nearly 100 times. It averaged a new record once a week during 2013. The European Central Bank unveiled a similar program early this year, sending markets there up by double digits. The Nikkei index has doubled in value in recent years amid aggressive stimulus from the Bank of Japan, yet the country suffered a recession in 2014.“I don’t think we’re in bubble territory or anything like that, but I think that monetary policy is doing its work,” said Paul Sheard, chief global economist at Standard & Poor’s.The one exception, analysts agree, could certainly be China. The Shanghai Composite Index is one of the best-performing in the world, doubling in value over the past year. Chinese officials have targeted an annual economic growth rate of 7 percent, but the country’s breakneck expansion has slowed considerably and is expected to come in just shy of that goal this year. The People’s Bank of China (BACHF) has slashed its benchmark rate to a record low over the weekend as markets swung wildly over the past few days. The Shanghai Composite plummeted 5­ percent at the end of Wednesday’s trading session after gaining a similar amount the day beforeSome analysts worried the turmoil in Greece could be the catalyst for a correction not only in Europe but around the world. The breakdown in negotiations over a bailout plan could wind up forcing Greece to drop the currency it shares with 18 other European countries and destabilize the entire region. It is unclear how the drama in Greece will affect markets. Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has called a referendum for Sunday that puts the future of any deal in voters’ hands. “Sure this is going to have long-run implications, but the near term the reaction in the Spanish or Portugese or Italian markets has been relatively muted,” said Desmond Lachman, resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. “It’s right for markets not to be panicking.”Still, all but the most bearish investors stop short of declaring that markets are in a bubble. Global growth may still be weak, but it has picked up in recent years. And a strong stock market can feed back into the economy through increased investor wealth and spending.Perhaps the biggest test of the rally’s strength could come later this year. The Fed expects it will raise its benchmark interest rate for the first time in nearly a decade, which would make it the first major central bank to begin backing off its easy money stance. Investors are nervous that an increase in rates could shift the dynamic of the markets.“Stock prices don’t always follow economic fundamentals,” Coffina said. “It works in both directions.”






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     H&E Equipment Services shares are down 0.43% to $18.55 in after-hours trading on Wednesday after closing trading down 6.71% following a negative note from analysts at KeyBanc today.Analyst Joe Box downgraded H&E's rating to "sector weight" from "overweight" today, projecting a "compressed equipment rental year" that could hurt the heavy construction and industrial equipment renter."Given the h...

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    opened higher on Wednesday as investors looked beyond the latest developments in Greece, which is going ahead with a referendum on July 5 to decide whether to accept the austerity demands of its creditors. Investors also digested better- than-expected job numbers from the private sector. The S&P 500 opened 15 points, or 0.7%, higher at 2,078. The Dow Jones Industrial Average added 148 points, or 0.8%, to 17,765. The Nasdaq Composite gained 41 points, or 0.8% to 5,028..

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    Stocks finished higher Wednesday as U.S. economic data overtook concern centered around Greece's debt woes. The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished up 138.40 points, or 0.8%, at 17,757.91. The S&P 500 Index closed up 14.32 points, or 0.7%, at 2,077.43.

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    By Anora Mahmudova and Carla Mozee, MarketWatch. Ace to buy Chubb in $28 billion deal. U.S. stocks finished higher Wednesday as investors looked beyond the latest developments in Greece and focused on economic data.

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     Exxon Mobil shares closed down 1% to $82.37 on Wednesday as oil prices fell due to an increase in U.S. crude supplies for the first rise in more than two months, according to Reuters. Crude oil is slumping by 4.2% to $56.97 per barrel and Brent crude is falling 2.39% to $62.07 per barrel, according to the CNBC.com index.

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    Treasury yields rose Wednesday on strong U.S. economic data ahead of Thursday's closely watched official jobs report, amid lingering Greek-debt negotiations. The Treasury selloff started in the overnight session on renewed hopes for a potential last-minute deal between Greece and its creditors. The price action was further enhanced by a strong U.S. private sector employment report along with a duo of better-than-expected reports on U.S. manufacturing and construction...

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    U.S. stocks closed higher on Wednesday, lifted by consumer staples and discretionary stocks, though indexes ended off the session's highs as energy stocks declined and Greece's debt crisis showed no clear sign of resolution.

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    Shares of Transocean (RIG) were falling 3.5% to $15.56 Wednesday as oil prices fall after U.S. inventory data showed an increase in crude oil stockpiles. WTI crude oil for August delivery was down 4.41% to $56.85 a barrel early Wednesday afternoon, and Brent crude oil for August delivery was down 2.53% to $62.98 a barrel.

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    Shares of Halcon Resources Corp. (HK) are down by 5.60% to $1.10 in late afternoon trading on Wednesday, as some stocks within the energy sector decline along with the price of oil. The commodity was driven lower by a rise in U.S. crude supplies and an advancement in the talks regarding Iran's nuclear program, Reuters reports.

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    * Greece's Tsipras accepts some conditions for debt deal * But Tsipras urges voters to reject deal at referendum * Upbeat data revive bets on U.S. Fed rate increase * U.S. bond market suffered worst quarter in two years By Richard Leong NEW YORK, July 1 - U.S. Treasuries prices fell on Wednesday as hopes for a Greece debt deal prompted investors to pare safe-haven bids, while a stronger-than-ex...

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    Shares of Goldcorp Inc. (GG) are slipping by 2.38% to $15.81 in late afternoon trading on Wednesday, as some mining and related stocks decline along with the price of gold. Gold for August delivery is down by 0.40% to $1,167.10 per ounce on the COMEX this afternoon.

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     Shares of Kinross Gold Corp   were retreating, down 5.39% to $2.19 in afternoon trading Wednesday, along with other gold related stocks as the precious metal trades in the negative. Gold prices are approaching a near four week low level on a stronger dollar as traders remain hopeful for progress in the Greek crisis, according to Reuters.

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    Shares of Chevron Corp  were declining by 0.76% to $95.74 in afternoon trading Wednesday, along with other oil related stocks as Iranian nuclear talks advance, according to Reuters. Oil prices are also under pressure following the release of data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.