DJIA: 17,668.41  -15.17 (-0.09%) | NASDAQ: 4,968.179  -23.762 (-0.48%) | S&P 500: 2,068.91  +0.15 (0.01%) Markets status unavailable

  • Show Article Details

    Shares of Chesapeake Energy (CHK) were falling 2% to $10.55 Monday as oil prices fell to three-month lows. WTI crude oil for August delivery was down 4.02% to $54.64 a barrel Monday morning, and Brent crude oil for August delivery was down 2.16% to $59.02 a barrel.

  • Show Article Details

    * ECB's governing council to hold call this afternoon. * Aetna falls after Humana deal. * All 30 Dow components in the red. * Energy index leads losses as oil prices fall. * Indexes down: Dow 0.72 pct, S&P 0.67 pct, Nasdaq 0.69 pct. By Tanya Agrawal.

  • Show Article Details

    began the week on a downbeat note as investors worldwide dumped riskier assets such as equities following Greece's overwhelming rejection of bailout terms, which increased the prospect of the country exiting the eurozone. The S&P 500 opened 16 points, or 0.8% lower at 2,059. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 150 points, or 0.8%, to 17,581. The Nasdaq Composite began the day down 48 points, or 1% at 4,961.. (END) Dow Jones Newswires 07-06-15 0952 ET Copyright (c) 2015 Dow Jones&...

  • Show Article Details

    U.S. stocks fell at the open on Monday after Greece rejected debt bailout terms, increasing the uncertainty over the future of the country's euro zone membership. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 77.66 points, or 0.44 percent, to 17,652.45. The S&P 500 lost 11.25 points, or 0.54 percent, to 2,065.53 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 41.29 points, or 0.82 percent, to 4,967.92.

  • Show Article Details

    * Merkel and Hollande to meet this afternoon. * Greece owes $3.5 bln bond payment to ECB on July 20. * Aetna falls after Humana deal. * Futures down: Dow 152 pts, S&P 16.25 pts, Nasdaq 34.5 pts. By Tanya Agrawal. U.S. stocks were set to open lower on Monday after Greece rejected debt bailout terms, throwing the future of the country's euro zone membership into further doubt.

  • Show Article Details

    U.S. stock futures fell Monday after Greek voters rejected proposed austerity measures in an historic referendum on Sunday, leaving the door wide open for Greece's exit from the eurozone.

  • Show Article Details

    - U.S. stocks fell in a volatile Monday session as Greeks resoundingly backed their government in rejecting the austerity terms of a bailout and China implemented emergency measures to stop a selloff in Shanghai's market.

  • Show Article Details

    * Futures down: Dow 138 pts, S&P 14.25 pts, Nasdaq 35.5 pts. U.S. stock index futures fell on Monday after Greece rejected debt bailout terms, throwing the future of the country's euro zone membership into further doubt. * World markets fell, but less sharply than expected and analysts attributed the relatively muted reaction to expectations the European Central Bank would act to limit any damage.

  • Show Article Details

    Updated from 7:03 a.m. Here are 10 things you should know for Monday, July 6: 1. -- U.S. stock futures were sinking as investors tried to determine what Greece could do about its heavy debt load, and wondered how a default might harm the wider markets.

  • Show Article Details

    The following factors could affect Italian markets on Monday. Reuters has not verified the newspaper reports, and cannot vouch for their accuracy. For a complete list of diary events in Italy please click on . DEBT.

  • Show Article Details

    U.S. stock-index futures sat solidly lower early Monday, as markets in Asia took a sharp drop after Greece voted to reject the terms of its current bailout agreement. About 10 hours ahead of the open of U.S. markets, the CBT eMini Dow Jones Industrial Average futures were 1.1% weaker, while eMini Nasdaq 100 futures and futures for the S&P 500 were down 1.2% each. All three were above their earlier lows immediately following the Greek referendum results, although they could change...

  • Show Article Details

    Stock index futures plunged Sunday evening, as Greek voters were set to reject the terms of an international bailout, the Wall Street Journal reported. More than 61% of voters reportedly cast ballots against creditors' demands in the referendum victory for the "no" campaign, which is opposed to more austerity policies.

  • Show Article Details

    The financial crisis in Greece has upended the lives — and livelihoods — of residents of the Mediterranean nation. The shutdown of the banking system has resulted in long lines at ATMs to withdraw a daily maximum of just 60 euros, about $67. Citizens have stockpiled food and fuel, leading to empty shelves at grocery stores and crowded gas stations. Business leaders have warned that shortages of crucial medicines could be next.It is the worst economic downturn faced by any developed nation since World War II. It strikes at the heart of the single currency that unites the 19-member euro zone and threatens to destabilize a fragile region.But for Main Street U.S.A., the ripple effects are few and far between. Here are the three big ways the Greek debt crisis — which is likely to intensify in coming days, after Greece rejected a European bailout package Sunday — could affect you personally, from your stock market and summer travel plans to how much it costs to buy a house.1) Your 401(k) could get scaryMarkets around the world plunged after negotiations broke down late last month between Greece and its European creditors. The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index logged its worst day so far this year, falling more than 2 percent. Analysts worried that the turmoil in Greece could signal the end of the six-year bull market in the United States. For those with a 401(k) retirement savings plan, the sell-off was a painful reminder of the volatility on Wall Street during the 2008 global financial crisis.//

    // But it didn’t appear to last — at least, not so far. U.S. markets regained much of their ground the next day and ended the short holiday trading week well off their lows. A recent survey of investors by Barclays (BCS) found that more than half thought that even a worst-case scenario in which Greece gets booted from the euro zone would register only as a blip in global markets. The United States has little direct exposure to the Greek debt crisis, and central banks have done a lot to set up firewalls against a broader panic. Only if the crisis spread badly to other countries such as Portugal and Italy would there be true reason for concern.2) Your vacation could get cheaperThe instability in Europe and the massive stimulus program by the region’s central bank have sent the euro plunging against the dollar. The currency hit a 12-year low in March — of $1.05 — before inching back up. But it began sliding again in mid-June as the crisis in Greece ramped up.The good news for Americans is that it means every dollar you’ve saved for that European vacation will go further — and summer is peak tourist season in Greece. Tourism officials have taken great pains to assure vacationers that the home of the Parthenon is open for business, though the U.S. Embassy in Greece released a statement warning visitors to maintain “a high level of security awareness.”The massive protests on the fate of Greece’s future in the euro zone have remained peaceful. But tourism accounted for about 16 percent of Greece’s economy in 2013 and supported 657,000 jobs, according to the World Travel and Tourism Council. Aristotle Tziampiris, associate professor of international relations at the University of Piraeus, worries that even the suggestion that something could be amiss on Greece’s famous beaches could be devastating.“Everything revolves around tourists, tavernas, shops and ships,” he said. “This is the wrong time.”Several travel sites recently advertised deals on European vacations. Orbitz (OWW) touted Greece as “a world of destinations.” German airline Lufthansa named Athens its “pick of the week” — perhaps ironic considering that Germany has drawn the hardest line among European nations in negotiations with Greece.3) Mortgage rates could stay really low Home buyers have enjoyed low interest rates in the aftermath of the Great Recession, as a weak recovery and Federal Reserve support helped mortgage rates hit record lows Now, after nearly seven years of easy-money policies, the U.S. central bank is considering raising its benchmark interest rate. Many analysts believe it could start hiking the rate as early as September.But that prediction comes with huge caveats. Fed officials do not want to cause undue market volatility when it raises rates. They learned that lesson in 2013, the last time they tried to pull back support for the recovery. Back then, the mere whiff of a change in the Fed’s easy-money stance was enough to send stock markets down the tank while mortgage rates shot up by a full percentage point. If Greece is still in turmoil this fall, and the future of the euro zone is still in question, and markets are exceptionally skittish, the Fed may be reluctant to add more uncertainty to the equation.Another factor that could give the Fed pause is the strength of the dollar. Although a strong dollar is great for European travel, it’s bad for U.S. exports. The blow to trade helped stop the American economy’s expansion in its tracks during the first quarter. And there is a chance we could see a repeat in the next few months.If the European Central Bank has to provide even more stimulus to Europe to offset a Greek tragedy, and if that causes another spike in the dollar, and if that takes another bite out of exports, the Fed might be hesitant to raise rates at a time when the U.S. economy is stumbling. And that would mean low mortgage rates would hang around for a little while longer.Granted, that’s a lot of ifs. It is a testament to how far this financial crisis is from Main Street, but also a remainder that no one can ever be completely insulated from the crosscurrents of the global economy.






  • Show Article Details

    Greece, Iran still in focus. Oil prices fell on Friday, in response to concerns over resilient U.S. crude production. The number of U.S. oil-drilling rigs rose by 12 to 640 in the past week, snapping 29 straight weeks of decline, data from Baker Hughes showed late on Thursday.

  • Show Article Details

    Investors planning for a second-half recovery should look to three of the worst first-half performers on the Dow -- Intel (INTC), Wal-Mart (WMT) and E. I. du Pont, . Take a look at the chart. Not only are all three companies trading at or near their 52-week lows, their respective stock valuations are cheap compared to their industry peers and when paired with the S&P 500 index, which is valued at a P/E of 21.

  • Show Article Details

    If the market is judge, jury, and executioner, then utilities have been tried, convicted, and sentenced to perpetual underperformance. It's time to consider an appeal. Utilities stocks fell 11% in the first six months of this year, which made them the worst-performing sector in the Standard& Poor's 500 index by a wide margin.

  • Show Article Details

    By Sam Forgione NEW YORK, July 2 (Reuters) - Investors in U.S.-based funds pulled $59.6 billion out of funds that specialize in U.S. shares in the first half of the year, putting the funds on track for their biggest annual outflows on record, preliminary data from Thomson Reuters' Lipper service showed on Thursday. The outflows from funds that mainly hold U.S. shares, so far this year through July 1, already overshadowed outflows in any other full year since Lipper records began in 1992, the data show. Funds that specialize in international shares have attracted $125.9 billion, which already surpassed last year's inflows of $115.3 billion, the preliminary data show. "The U.S. market may be a little overpriced, a little frothy, and investors are looking overseas to get better values," Lipper research analyst Patrick Keon said. The benchmark U.S. S&P 500 stock index has risen just 0.9 percent this year after rallying more than 11 percent in 2014. Overall, investors committed $64.4 billion to stock funds in the first half, less than a third of the funds' $231.4 billion inflows in all of 2014, the data show. Taxable bond funds, by comparison, attracted $49.3 billion in the first half after attracting $86.3 billion in the first half of last year, the preliminary data show. In the latest week ended July 1, stock funds posted $10.9 billion in outflows, their biggest since early May, while taxable bond funds posted $4.6 billion in outflows after attracting $3.4 billion in inflows the prior week. Investors shunned both U.S. and international stocks, however, in the latest week. Funds that specialize in U.S. shares bled $9.8 billion, marking their second straight week of outflows and their biggest since early May, while international-focused stock funds posted $1.1 billion in withdrawals to mark their first outflows since early February. Investors also pulled the most cash out of investment-grade bond funds so far this year, at $655 million, and yanked $3 billion out of riskier high-yield bond funds to mark their biggest outflows since mid-December. Investors fled to the safety of funds that specialize in U.S. Treasuries, which attracted their second straight week of inflows at $384 million. The weekly Lipper fund flow data is compiled from reports issued by U.S.-domiciled mutual funds and exchange-traded funds. The following is a broad breakdown of the flows for the week, including exchange-traded funds (in $ billions): Sector Flow Chg % Assets Assets Count ($Bil) ($Bil) All Equity Funds -10.851 -0.20 5,343.522 11,751 Domestic Equities -9.774 -0.25 3,817.073 8,436 Non-Domestic -1.076 -0.07 1,526.449 3,315 Equities All Taxable Bond -4.640 -0.20 2,331.477 6,100 Funds All Money Market 12.249 0.54 2,286.457 1,266 Funds All Municipal Bond -1.199 -0.35 343.712 1,493 Funds (Reporting by Sam Forgione; Editing by Alan Crosby and Christian Plumb)

  • Show Article Details

    The June U.S. jobs report, which showed that hiring picked up but wages were flat, helped lift the bond market on Thursday. The weaker-than-expected jobs report seemed to be "good news" for bond investors because it was taken as an indication that the data-dependent Federal Reserve could use the report as an excuse to delay the first interest-rate increase in nearly a decade until late 2015.. The yield on the 10- year Treasury note fell 2.3 basis points to 2.393% on Thursday.

  • Show Article Details

    Tech stocks in the S&P 500 rose more than 1% to outperform the wider S&P index and the Dow Jones Industrial Average, both of which fell slightly. Shares of Xoom (XOOM), a provider of digital money transferring services soared more than 21% after an announcement that PayPal would acquire the San Francisco-based company in a deal worth about $890 million.PayPal will pay about $25 a share for Xoom (XOOM), which...