DJIA: 17,751.39  +121.12 (0.69%) | NASDAQ: 5,111.733  +22.527 (0.44%) | S&P 500: 2,108.57  +15.32 (0.73%) Markets status unavailable

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    Allstate (ALL)  has been selling various forms of insurance since 1931. ALL has traded between $57 and $73 over the past 52 weeks. Technically, I read ALL's one-year stochastic pattern and Relative Strength Index pattern as being bullish with potential for further upside improvement. ALL has the characteristics that I look for in an options trade that I label as being a "shooter."

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    Amazon (AMZN) is campaigning for its own drone zone. The online retailer has unveiled a proposal to designate a space of air 200 to 400 feet from the ground for high-speed delivery drones. Amazon's (AMZN) vision included drone-tracking capabilities and interaction between drone traffic within the low altitude flying area.

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      Earnings season has been erratic thus far, but overall corporate America is healthy, and that bodes well for high-grade bonds, said Craig Bishop, lead strategist for RBC Wealth Management's U.S. Fixed Income Strategies Group . "We've seen good earnings and some poor earnings, but overall we are positive on the corporate bond space, especially the investment-grade space," said Bishop.

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     Oil prices jumped on the latest inventory report, but one energy trader said downside risks remain for crude. The EIA reported a surprise 4.2-million barrel drop in crude supplies on Wednesday. But even as oil prices rose, Luke Rahbari, Chief Investment Officer at Stutland Volatility, said oil will remain under pressure in the near term due to the strong U.S. dollar and weakness in China.

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    Users love the social-media platform, which bodes well for the stock. Remember in late 2012 when Facebook (FB) was going to wither like MySpace? Supposedly, the kids were logging off for good, the transition to mobile would fail, and users would get alienated by more ads, which they'd never click on anyway.

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      Financial Engines (FNGN) will continue to outperform because the company offers a valuable service to those who desperately need investing guidance, said George Young, portfolio manager for the Villere Balanced Fund (VILLX). "This is a company that helps people save for retirement and to invest correctly," said Young about the company founded by Nobel Prize winning economist Bill Sharpe.

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    Fed acknowledges improvement in the labor market. The Federal Reserve hinted strongly Wednesday that it's ready to raise interest rates in September. The statement after the meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee didn't provide any explicit guidance about the timing of the first rate hike since 2006, but a fair reading between the lines of the statement indicates that all of the conditions have been met to raise the federal funds target rate above zero percent.

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    In a television first, CBS (CBS) has confirmed its plans to live-stream every national commercial that plays during the Super Bowl next year. The cost for those commercial spots is going up as well. Anheuser-Busch InBev (BUD), PepsiCo (PEP) and Fiat Chrysler are among the companies expected to advertise again during the Super Bowl, according to Variety, which first reported the news.

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      International Paper (IP) reported an earnings beat on Wednesday, but missed on revenue. The company posted profits of 97 cents a share on revenue of $5.7 billion, beating analysts' earnings estimates of 92 cents per share but coming up short of Wall Street's revenue estimates of $5.8 billion.

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    I'm staying conservative on the bull side for now. The chart wasn't all that exciting into earnings, but the push upward on Tuesday has set this one up to slowly climb higher. We have a strong short-term relative strength index confirming the price action. On the weekly chart, the close this Friday looks to be important.

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    United Continental (UAL) has become the latest high-profile victim of Internet hackers. The world's second largest airline discovered the computer-systems breach in May and has linked the attack to a group of China-backed cyber criminals.

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    Jim Cramer asked me to comment on Tuesday's Mad Money interview with David Demshur, the CEO of oil services company Core Labs , in which Demshur called a bottom in oil prices and was expecting a very strong rally through the end of the year. While I agree with some of the analysis Demshur used to make his call, I think his timing is off the mark.

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    The battle over active versus passive management is overdone. "Well-diversified portfolios should have a little of both, active and passive," said Hoops. Passive, or index investing, has significantly outperformed active over the past decade in both performance and fund flows.

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    The recent crashes and instability in the Chinese stock market continue. The crisis has woken up many people to the serious problem of the Chinese credit bubble and the likelihood that the country's economic growth will continue to slow. Once upon a time, the majority of the population in the West was involved in agriculture. Industry eventually followed a similar trend.

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    To be a 20-something is to wrestle again and again with big life moments: Graduating from college. Getting a job. Moving into your own place. Getting another job. Getting married. Buying a house, maybe, or having a kid.Each milestone comes with plenty of reasons to worry about money. Or as millennial-focused financial adviser Sophia Bera more enthusiastically puts it, “major planning opportunities.”And that really matters: Your 20s are when adult things start happening, and the way you handle them can ripple through the rest of adult life. Start saving and taking care of your credit now, and you could save thousands of dollars later on.So, 20-somethings, make the most of it. To help out, here’s some advice from financial planners who work with young people — milestones to aim for before you turn 30 and tips that could give you a big boost later in life.Start saving for retirement — nowEmployee Benefit Research Institute surveys suggest that many people delay saving for retirement.Young people are less likely to have jobs that offer a retirement plan, the data show, but even those that do are less inclined to save than coworkers a few decades their senior.//

    // Financial advisers say that’s a mistake. Money invested in your 20s has much more time to grow, meaning you might not need to set as much aside later on in life.And if your employer matches those contributions, your retirement savings will grow even faster. Advisers recommend putting enough aside to max out employer matches.That’s why advisers like Bera and Antwone Harris of Charles Schwab (SCHW) say retirement savings is one of their top priorities for clients, even above paying down student loans.Harris gives his clients an example of the importance of starting early: Someone who saves money for 10 years starting at 25, assuming steady growth, will retire with more than someone who starts at 35 and saves for the next 30.Put another way, you can put away 10 to 15 percent of your income in your 20s, or you can wait and save 25 percent or more in your late 30s to get the same result, Harris says. Wait even longer, and in your late 40s, you’ll have to put away 35 percent just to catch up.“Most people go, ‘Well, when I start to earn more money, I’ll save more.’ They just don’t realize how critical those initial years are and how much less they’d have to save over time,” Harris said. “It makes a huge difference.”[Why putting off retirement savings until you make more money is a big mistake]Set up an emergency fundFirst, some good news: Young people don’t appear any less inclined to stash away money for emergencies than their elders, according to Bankrate.com polling data.A little over a quarter of 18- to 29-year-olds said in June they don’t have any money set aside; that’s in line with other age groups.Here’s the bad news: That still means a lot of young people aren’t setting up emergency funds.Financial advisers say that people who are single should have six months of expenses saved up, in case they lose their jobs, have a medical crisis or otherwise need money to stay afloat. Married couples should have three months’ worth saved up, Harris said.Plus, people in their 20s tend to have less saved for emergencies than older people. Fewer than half of respondents in the 20-something category had three months of expenses set aside. Only 14 percent had six months’ worth saved up, compared to double that among people 50 and up.Bera recommends setting up a separate bank account and funding it gradually, say $100 a month, with automatic transfers or direct deposit.[Build emergency savings first. Then pay down that debt.]Pay off your credit cardsAll debt isn’t created equal, says Harris of Charles Schwab.He splits it into two categories: “good debt,” low-interest loans that help you get something that gains value (like a house or an education), and “bad debt” like credit cards, which carry high interest rates.So Harris and other financial advisers recommend eliminating the higher-rate debt first. Pay the minimum balance on student loans, but be more aggressive with credit cards, which often sport interest rates in the high teens.Student loans are important, too, but beyond minimum monthly payments, advisers say they don’t need to be a top priority. It’s more important to set money aside for retirement and emergencies; financial advisers recommend paying down student loans after taking care of those higher priorities and paying off credit card debt.Debt weighs especially heavily on young people’s net worth, census data show. People younger than 35 had a median net worth of just $6,676 in 2011, well under the national average of $68,828.//

    // Younger people have had less time to build up savings or buy assets like a home, which partly explains the divide. But consider this: If you lined up everyone younger than 35 by net worth, the bottom fifth would have a net worth of negative $22,646. The next fifth would have a median net worth of $0.That’s not to say everyone older than 35 is more prosperous, but it does show that debt is weighing down many young people.Keep an eye on creditKeeping on top of credit card and student loan payments should give your credit score a boost, but Bera cautions that that’s not enough to ensure a good credit score.She recommends checking your credit report regularly to make sure some long-ago bill that got lost in the shuffle isn’t dinging your creditworthiness.Credit scores matter — a lot. They dictate whether you can get a loan and what interest you pay on it. Go to buy a house, say, and a years-old mistake could cost thousands of dollars.By law, you’re entitled to one free copy of your credit report a year from each of the major credit bureaus — TransUnion, Equifax (EFX) and Experian (EXPGF). One idea: Stagger when you request them, and you can check in on your credit once every four months.They’re also easy and quick to pull. They can be requested for free at AnnualCreditReport.com.It’s a right that most Americans — especially young people — aren’t taking advantage of.A survey from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling earlier this year found that only about a third of all respondents had pulled their credit report in the last year; 18- to 34-year-olds had the lowest rate, at 32 percent.Make longer-term goalsBeyond debt and retirement savings, advisers recommend setting specific financial goals with set time frames.Looking to save for a house eventually? Set an amount and a number of years. The same goes for other goals, be it getting married or having a kid.The time frame is important, Harris says, because the duration of your investments should dictate how much risk you take on.Hoping to cash out an investment in a couple of years? You should play it safe, sticking to low-risk options like certificates of deposit or certain bonds.Have more time to work with? You might be able to wade into the stock market, where the risks and returns are potentially greater.A word of caution if you do, though, says Harris: Individual stocks are riskier plays for beginning investors. Index funds and exchange-traded funds can make for easier, and better diversified, investments that draw on a bigger sampling of the market.“They really need to be honest with themselves about how much they know about investing,” Harris said.Read more from Get There:A college graduate’s guide to managing money in the real worldWhy millennials shouldn’t rush into home ownershipMillennials aren’t job hopping as much as previous generations. Here’s why that’s bad.






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    To be a 20-something is to wrestle again and again with big life moments: Graduating from college. Getting a job. Moving into your own place. Getting another job. Getting married. Buying a house, maybe, or having a kid.Each milestone comes with plenty of reasons to worry about money. Or as millennial-focused financial adviser Sophia Bera more enthusiastically puts it, “major planning opportunities.”And that really matters: Your 20s are when adult things start happening, and the way you handle them can ripple through the rest of adult life. Start saving and taking care of your credit now, and you could save thousands of dollars later on.So, 20-somethings, make the most of it. To help out, here’s some advice from financial planners who work with young people — milestones to aim for before you turn 30 and tips that could give you a big boost later in life.Start saving for retirement — nowEmployee Benefit Research Institute surveys suggest that many people delay saving for retirement.Young people are less likely to have jobs that offer a retirement plan, the data show, but even those that do are less inclined to save than coworkers a few decades their senior.//

    // Financial advisers say that’s a mistake. Money invested in your 20s has much more time to grow, meaning you might not need to set as much aside later on in life.And if your employer matches those contributions, your retirement savings will grow even faster. Advisers recommend putting enough aside to max out employer matches.That’s why advisers like Bera and Antwone Harris of Charles Schwab (SCHW) say retirement savings is one of their top priorities for clients, even above paying down student loans.Harris gives his clients an example of the importance of starting early: Someone who saves money for 10 years starting at 25, assuming steady growth, will retire with more than someone who starts at 35 and saves for the next 30.Put another way, you can put away 10 to 15 percent of your income in your 20s, or you can wait and save 25 percent or more in your late 30s to get the same result, Harris says. Wait even longer, and in your late 40s, you’ll have to put away 35 percent just to catch up.“Most people go, ‘Well, when I start to earn more money, I’ll save more.’ They just don’t realize how critical those initial years are and how much less they’d have to save over time,” Harris said. “It makes a huge difference.”[Why putting off retirement savings until you make more money is a big mistake]Set up an emergency fundFirst, some good news: Young people don’t appear any less inclined to stash away money for emergencies than their elders, according to Bankrate.com polling data.A little over a quarter of 18- to 29-year-olds said in June they don’t have any money set aside; that’s in line with other age groups.Here’s the bad news: That still means a lot of young people aren’t setting up emergency funds.Financial advisers say that people who are single should have six months of expenses saved up, in case they lose their jobs, have a medical crisis or otherwise need money to stay afloat. Married couples should have three months’ worth saved up, Harris said.Plus, people in their 20s tend to have less saved for emergencies than older people. Fewer than half of respondents in the 20-something category had three months of expenses set aside. Only 14 percent had six months’ worth saved up, compared to double that among people 50 and up.Bera recommends setting up a separate bank account and funding it gradually, say $100 a month, with automatic transfers or direct deposit.[Build emergency savings first. Then pay down that debt.]Pay off your credit cardsAll debt isn’t created equal, says Harris of Charles Schwab.He splits it into two categories: “good debt,” low-interest loans that help you get something that gains value (like a house or an education), and “bad debt” like credit cards, which carry high interest rates.So Harris and other financial advisers recommend eliminating the higher-rate debt first. Pay the minimum balance on student loans, but be more aggressive with credit cards, which often sport interest rates in the high teens.Student loans are important, too, but beyond minimum monthly payments, advisers say they don’t need to be a top priority. It’s more important to set money aside for retirement and emergencies; financial advisers recommend paying down student loans after taking care of those higher priorities and paying off credit card debt.Debt weighs especially heavily on young people’s net worth, census data show. People younger than 35 had a median net worth of just $6,676 in 2011, well under the national average of $68,828.//

    // Younger people have had less time to build up savings or buy assets like a home, which partly explains the divide. But consider this: If you lined up everyone younger than 35 by net worth, the bottom fifth would have a net worth of negative $22,646. The next fifth would have a median net worth of $0.That’s not to say everyone older than 35 is more prosperous, but it does show that debt is weighing down many young people.Keep an eye on creditKeeping on top of credit card and student loan payments should give your credit score a boost, but Bera cautions that that’s not enough to ensure a good credit score.She recommends checking your credit report regularly to make sure some long-ago bill that got lost in the shuffle isn’t dinging your creditworthiness.Credit scores matter — a lot. They dictate whether you can get a loan and what interest you pay on it. Go to buy a house, say, and a years-old mistake could cost thousands of dollars.By law, you’re entitled to one free copy of your credit report a year from each of the major credit bureaus — TransUnion, Equifax (EFX) and Experian (EXPGF). One idea: Stagger when you request them, and you can check in on your credit once every four months.They’re also easy and quick to pull. They can be requested for free at AnnualCreditReport.com.It’s a right that most Americans — especially young people — aren’t taking advantage of.A survey from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling earlier this year found that only about a third of all respondents had pulled their credit report in the last year; 18- to 34-year-olds had the lowest rate, at 32 percent.Make longer-term goalsBeyond debt and retirement savings, advisers recommend setting specific financial goals with set time frames.Looking to save for a house eventually? Set an amount and a number of years. The same goes for other goals, be it getting married or having a kid.The time frame is important, Harris says, because the duration of your investments should dictate how much risk you take on.Hoping to cash out an investment in a couple of years? You should play it safe, sticking to low-risk options like certificates of deposit or certain bonds.Have more time to work with? You might be able to wade into the stock market, where the risks and returns are potentially greater.A word of caution if you do, though, says Harris: Individual stocks are riskier plays for beginning investors. Index funds and exchange-traded funds can make for easier, and better diversified, investments that draw on a bigger sampling of the market.“They really need to be honest with themselves about how much they know about investing,” Harris said.Read more from Get There:A college graduate’s guide to managing money in the real worldWhy millennials shouldn’t rush into home ownershipMillennials aren’t job hopping as much as previous generations. Here’s why that’s bad.






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    General Motors (GM) will help its Chinese partner, SAIC Motor, become a bigger player on the world stage while revamping its Chevrolet line for non-U.S. customers by investing $5 billion to jointly develop cars for emerging markets such as Brazil, India and Mexico.