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    How you vacation says a lot about you. Dash around like a crazed squirrel? Hole up in a hammock sloth-style? A new survey gives insights into how people travel for pleasure and business, showing how people from China travel differently than the French, how Thais are not like Germans, and how Americans look more like Italians and Indians.The study by TripAdvisor's TripBarometer, a survey of more than 44,000 users and travel providers, looks at how travelers use their smartphones while traveling. And that can suggest which cultures like to disconnect while traveling, and which stayed attached and addicted.In broad strokes, the survey found South Americans, Middle Easterners and Asians are more likely to be the most connected when they're away from home. Europeans were at the other end of the spectrum, more likely to leave the phone in their hotel room while traveling."The thought and the dream of getting away from it all is not the same as the reality of getting away from it all," said Stephanie Boyle, a spokeswoman from TripAdvisor. "Asian travelers are so used to be switched on all the time, whereas French and German travelers are more 'I want to get away from it all' switched-off travelers."Two-thirds of Thai and Chinese travelers were in the highest category of smartphone usage, while about 60 percent of Brazilians and Indonesians, and 53 percent of Malaysian travelers, used the device at the same level.By contrast, only 28 percent of French people on holiday relied heavily on their phones, and only 38 percent of Germans. Americans were right about in the middle with 48 percent of travelers very tethered to their handheld wizard, about the same rate as Italians, Australians and Indians.The survey examined how much people use the devices for a combination of researching trips, booking trips and then using them during the trip for further research and reservations. That measure can define the people who are most eager to be permanently on the grid, even while away from home, and those who are more likely to be untethered when they are away.//

    // The survey had other findings about how travelers' wants as well. Even as usage varies, the increasing number of travelers, from anywhere, who expect to use their electronic devices everywhere also want more things from their travel providers. The mandate for providing WiFi is already old news.Now travelers want chargers on hand for a variety of portable devices so they don’t have to haul them or go dead if they forget something. And they want SIM cards for mobile phones when they are abroad so they can get service or avoid gigantic roaming fees.Consumers want the smartphones at their disposal, but they don't like the burden of having to tote the cables and chargers for keeping them alive.Sixty percent of the TripBarometer participants said they want adapters and converters for the differences between electrical connections in different countries. And 54 percent said they wanted chargers available for music players, phones, cameras and other electronics. It's no fun being on vacation and having the camera go dead. And a business trip is going to go very badly if the laptop battery dies."Connected travelers are not stingy. They are willing to pay for it. But they want it available," said Boyle. "One thing people hate paying for is WiFi, but if you are offering you a service they don’t expect like a charger or SIM card, that is great."Once again, regional differences appear."Hoteliers in Asia are offering that SIM card more than in established Western markets because they are used to travelers needing that," she said.//

    // As expected, younger travelers are driving the demand. About a third of millennials fall into the highest smartphone usage group, more than three times the rate for retirees.Why whip out the smartphone on the road? Because you're lost. Using maps is the most common use of smartphones on a trip. Two-thirds of people said they used the smartphone for getting around. People also love connecting to social media on the road to share the fabulous details of their travels.The phones are also heavily used for finding things to do and places to eat, often through online reviews.//

    // And the trend is only going to increase. The survey found the share of people using smartphones to book reservations doubled in the past year. It's still a small share, but it's seems like a powerful indicator of what travelers will be doing in the future.Methodology of the survey: The TripBarometer study, by TripAdvisor (TRIP), is based upon an online survey conducted from Jan. 16 to Feb. 2, 2015, conducted by Ipsos (IPSOF), a global research firm. A total of 44,277 interviews were completed in 32 markets, spanning seven regions. The sample is made up of 34,016 consumers who are TripAdvisor Web site users and Ipsos (IPSOF) online panelists who chose to take part in the survey and have researched their travel plans online in the last year; and 10,261 representatives from accommodation properties who use TripAdvisor's (TRIP) free marketing services, making it the world’s largest combined accommodation and traveler survey. The consumer survey data is weighted to represent the known profile of the global online population, to keep in line with previous waves of TripBarometer. Equal weighting is also applied at country level for the business survey.






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    When five African cyclists stood on a podium in Amsterdam's Rijksmuseum in front of Rembrandt's masterpiece The Night Watch this week Douglas Ryder probably pinched himself. Former Olympic cyclist Ryder is the man who a decade ago took on a small continental African team and dreamed of turning it into one capable of competing in the world's greatest races.

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    Totalplay, the pay TV, Internet and fixed-line company owned by Mexican billionaire Ricardo Salinas, is considering participating in an upcoming tender for a $7 billion wholesale mobile network, the company's chief executive said on Thursday.

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    It wasn't exactly Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao but the CEOs of T-Mobile  and Sprint (S) engaged in a surprisingly fierce Twitter feud late Wednesday. In Thursday trading, T-Mobile's stock price closed up 0.88% to $35.71, while Sprint's (S) shares dropped 0.88% to $4.48. . This article is commentary by an independent contributor.

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    Summer tends to be a slower time for news in general, and gadget news in particular. Companies have laid out their plans for next year, but it's still a little too far away to be talking devices. No one wants to talk about back-to-school yet, let alone the holidays. And when there's no real news? It's time for rumors.Here's a look at what's swirling around Apple's next models of the iPhone. These aren't nearly as far-fetched as they have been in years past. But, that said, rumors should always be taken with a grain or two of salt.Using the Force (Touch): Apple introduced the concept of the Force Touch earlier this year for the new MacBook and the Apple Watch. Devices with the feature can distinguish between a tap and a push and offer you different options based on how hard you're pushing -- think of it as a sort of right-click for your touchscreen or touchpad. Last week, Bloomberg reported that Apple will put this capability into the next round of iPhones, as well. Citing unnamed "people with knowledge of the matter," the report said that these Force Touch iPhones are already in early production.Bringing the feature to the iPhone would make sense. Force Touch is a nice addition to the Apple Watch, giving users more options even with limited screen space. It's not quite as intuitive as tapping and swiping, but it doesn't take long to catch onto. People obviously understand the concept of pushing on screens -- we've been doing that for a while.So shiny:MacRumors reports that the company is also expected to use the aluminum from the Apple Watch Sport. That comes from an analyst note by KGI Securities Ming-Chi Kuo, who has had a very strong record on Apple rumors in the past. The report says that Apple will also be offering a rose gold iPhone option -- similar to the coloring of the $10,000 and up tier of the Apple Watch Edition -- and will also tweak the shades of its current gold and gray (Space Gray, to be exact) models to be more like the shades of the Watch.Apple chief executive Tim Cook has said that customers in the all-important Chinese market are fond of gold tones. Plus, it also makes some sense that Apple would want to align the colors and finishes on its products -- though the more demure among us would likely want to see some differences between the jewelry finishes of the Watch and what you'd see on a phone.Faster, better, stronger: A report from 9 to 5 Mac indicates that Apple may be using a new Qualcomm (QCOM) chip to boost Internet speeds in its next model. The site's Marc Gurman points out this addition could deliver "up to twice the theoretical LTE download speeds" of the current models, though real-world performance would vary based on your actual cellular network.The energy efficiency could also help extend the phone's battery life, Gurman reported. Upping battery life was a big focus in Apple's developers conference presentation on its next mobile operating system, and this rumor would seem to dovetail nicely with that.Other stuff: Apple has been releasing its phone in the fall for multiple generations at this point, and there's no real indication that it will deviate from that schedule. Given the production schedule, Apple seems likely to be aiming for an early fall or late summer launch, as Boy Genius Report indicated back in March.Most reports seem to indicate that Apple will be falling in line with its latest patterns and releasing both an "iPhone 6S" and an "iPhone 6S Plus," keeping the formula it used for last year's models -- and  the same screen sizes.There's also a report from 9 to 5 Mac that Apple may be planning a refresh of the iPod. The music player's sales have been flagging over the past several years as more people use their smartphones as their primary music players, something one might expect to accelerate now that Apple has its own streaming music service. That said, the report said that a customer spotted a photo of iPods in as-yet-unreleased colors while upgrading to the latest version of iTunes -- raising hope for those who don't want the dedicated music player to be dead quite yet.






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    It's finally happened. The North American organization responsible for handing out new IP addresses says its banks have run dry.That's right: ARIN, the American Registry for Internet Numbers, has had to turn down a request for the unique numbers that we assign to each and every smartphone, tablet and PC so they can talk to the Internet. For the first time, ARIN didn't have enough IP addresses left in its stock to satisfy an entire order — and now, it's activated the end-times protocol that will see the few remaining addresses out into the night.IP addresses are crucial to the operation of the Internet. They're the numbers behind URLs like "google.com" or "facebook.com." They identify every device that connects to the Web, from servers to connected cars. The original designers of the Internet thought they'd only need around 4 billion unique combinations, derived from the series of dots and digits that make up IP addresses everywhere.How wrong they were.By 2020, humanity will be living alongside 25 billion Internet-connected devices, according to Gartner (IT) researchers. The rising global demand for Web-enabled devices is far outstripping the original system's ability to keep up. Left, uh, unaddressed, this problem would have put a stranglehold on the Web, keeping it from growing. It would've kept you from using new devices like smartwatches or smart refrigerators. Entirely new technologies we haven't dreamt of might never have emerged. We'd have been stuck with the Internet that we now have, forever.If you haven't already guessed, we have a backup system in place so that Xboxes and Playstations of the future can continue to get online. Internet engineers have actually been anticipating this day for decades. To understand how they've solved it, let's let one of the original designers of the Internet explain:[Some of the content in this entry could not be displayed on this device.]The solution is known as IPv6, short for "version 6." It's an upgrade of the old IP numbering system, known as IPv4. While it won't replace the old system, it's considered the future of the Internet. It has to be, by necessity. At ARIN, large requests for IPv4 addresses will now be subject to rationing or waitlisting."The number of days remaining before depletion are dwindling," wrote Richard Jimmerson, ARIN's chief information officer, in a blog post Thursday. "It is very likely that we are already processing a request that we will be unable to fulfill."Some companies, such as Google (GOOG), flipped the switch on IPv6 in 2012, and the number of devices, Web sites and Internet providers using IPv6 has been growing.Not every company has made the jump yet — it takes more elbow grease and money than not doing anything at all. But the switch is inevitable. We've already passed the point where Internet-connected devices outnumber people, and the original system is at its breaking point.Luckily, IPv6 offers 340 trillion trillion trillion possible unique combinations. Hopefully this will last us a while.






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    Mexico's telecoms regulator said on Thursday that a new tender process for digital TV channels will begin in the last quarter of 2015, and the winner will be announced in the first half of 2016. The step comes after the regulator in April revoked the awarding of a new TV network to media group Grupo Radio Centro, which failed to pay the sum required to secure it.

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    Cuba has opened 35 Wi-Fi access points nationwide, offering unprecedented online access in a country that until now has restricted use of the Internet to an elite few. Before the Wi-Fi signals became available on Wednesday, broadband Internet access had been limited to largely to desktops at state Internet parlors and pricey hotels. "It was high time for Cuba to be able to connect.

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    The threat of a hack is among banks' biggest fears. And those threats are becoming more frequent, and more sophisticated, according to a report released Thursday by the U.S. "Depository institutions are estimated to have incurred hundreds of millions of dollars in losses from breaches in the systems of their corporate customers that allowed criminals to illegally transfer funds from the customer's bank accounts, and from frauds perpetrated against their automated teller...

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    Welcome to Main Street Morning, The Washington Post’s daily collection of news affecting entrepreneurs, start-ups and small businesses with a special focus on policy and government.Here’s what’s affecting my small business my clients and other entrepreneurs today.WashingtonYou can now take photos (and tweet them!) on your next White House tour.The White House’s proposed overtime policy could hurt small businesses, trade groups say.The Export-Import Bank’s charter has expired for the first time since its founding.The Affordable Care Act is causing younger, healthier to get health insurance. The EconomyU.S. construction spending rises to a six-and-a-half year high.A report predicts slow economic growth for the Midwest and Plains states.Job creation by private companies is heating up this summer.U.S. franchise job gains bounced back and the U.S. private sector added 237,000 jobs last month.U.S. debt could be headed towards Greek levels.A key manufacturing index went up in June.Chrysler tops Ford in latest retail numbers.The ElectionsMacy’s cuts its ties with Donald Trump.Hillary Clinton raises a record $45 million in first half of her campaign.Twitter pounces on Chris Christie’s hilarious hashtag fail.PeopleVirtual internships could be your new solution for hiring millennials.On-demand mailing service Shyp plans to now classify its couriers as employees and not contractors.A Silicon Valley start-up explains why it’s ditching freelancers. ManagementFive phrases that signal you’re about to make a bad decision.How to find potential business partners when you’re a “nobody.”The ADP-Zenefits fiasco is a lesson in how partners break bad.ProductivityIf you lack inspiration then get yourself to a Maker Faire.EntrepreneursThe case for becoming a data-driven entrepreneur.Why it’s so hard to be an entrepreneur.Ellen DeGeneres launches a lifestyle brand.Why Kim Kardashian is everything that’s right about America.RetailA business owner claims that construction at a local Walmart trapped her at work.RestaurantsDunkin’ Donuts is phasing out styrofoam cups.How the proposed overtime pay changes could affect your restaurant.FinanceSweetgreen raises more lettuce to continue its expansion.After supporting the inclusion of transgender girls, the Girl Scouts’ crowdfunding campaign hits $250K.An employee expense management software company raises $100 million.Sales & MarketingA serial entrepreneur explains how to take an idea and match it with a market need.This is the value of super-users for your brand.Start-UpsThese are killer marketing strategies that will make your start-up look like an established brand.TechnologyOffice 365 enterprise users can now broadcast to 10,000 people at once.Colleges and tech firms are joining forces to try to make campus life safer.OnlineThese are the best small business blogs of 2015.Buying .sucks domains is a ridiculous exercise in futility.CBS launches a site to help small businesses.Social MediaFacebook tweaks its logo for first time in 10 years.OpportunitiesA former prison is for sale.Around the CountrySomeone is breaking into underground vaults in California to sever major internet cables.A Massachusetts contractor is ordered to pay $125,000 for violating wage laws.A long-time business owner in Albuquerque is revamping a problem shopping center.Delaware is the only state without commercial air travel.A suburb of Detroit is offering free Uber rides to jurors to and from the courthouse.Around the WorldGlobal factory growth eases.After 50 years, the U.S. is re-establishing an embassy in Cuba.GM halts production at its single assembly plant in Russia amid plummeting salesGreece isn’t the first nation to default on a sovereign debt.Gene Marks owns the Marks Group,  a Bala Cynwyd  PA  consulting firm that helps clients with customer relationship management. Follow Gene Marks and On Small Business on Twitter.News we should know about? Email us here.






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    YouTube (GOOG) was a video dating sitehttps:// youtu.be/jNQXAC9IVRwNow the most popular video sharing site on the Internet, YouTube (GOOG) at first seemed anything but destined for future success. It launched on Valentine’ s Day 2005 as a video dating site with the unofficial slogan“ Tune In, Hook Up.” However, the company’ s founders admit that the original idea never took off as...

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    The following are mergers under. APPROVALS AND WITHDRAWALS. -- China National Chemical Corp to acquire Italian tyre maker Pirelli. NEW LISTINGS. -- U.S. healthcare company Danaher Corp (DHR) to acquire air and water filter maker Pall Corp (PLL). -- Swiss travel retailer Dufry to acquire Italian peer World Duty Free.

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    The European Union's second highest court on Thursday found a shareholder loan given to France Telecom, now named Orange, was not state aid and therefore was legal. The decision overturns a 2004 finding by the European Commission that the loan was incompatible with EU law.

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    Tesla Motors (TSLA) shares were moving higher in early trade after the electric vehicle maker said it delivered 11,507 Model S vehicles in the second quarter, a new company record. The results, released this morning, represent an increase of 52% year-over-year, when it delivered 7,579 vehicles in the second quarter of 2014.

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    British electrical goods and mobile phone retailer Dixons Carphone said its Connected World Services division has signed a deal with Sprint Corp. (S), the U.S. mobile network operator, to open and manage Sprint-branded stores in the U.S.. Dixons Carphone, formed last year from the merger of Dixons Retail and Carphone Warehouse, said the first phase of the deal will see CWS supply mobile phone reta...

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    Israeli defence electronics firm Elbit Systems Ltd (ESLT) said on Thursday a subsidiary won a contract worth $150 million from the Dutch Ministry of Defence to supply advanced systems for infantry soldiers in the Benelux countries. The contract will be carried out over five years.