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    Amazon on Tuesday unveiled its latest effort to bring more speed and convenience to online shopping: A WiFi-connected gadget called the Amazon Dash Button that allows shoppers to refill orders of household staples with the press of a button.The adhesive buttons are meant to be hung in convenient places around the home — so, for example, you might stick the Tide-branded button on the washing machine or the Huggies button in the nursery.  When it's time to restock that item, you push the button and Amazon will soon ship it to your doorstep.At launch, the Dash button is only available for a limited number of household staples, such as Cottonelle toilet paper, Bounty paper towels and Glad trash bags. Using the Amazon smartphone app, consumers will configure the button to order exactly what they want — such as a four-pack of Gillette razors or a 12-pack.Dash buttons are free and are available now to Amazon Prime customers on an invitation-only basis.Like so many other Prime perks, the Dash button seems aimed at deepening customers' connection to the Amazon ecosystem, and in turn, boosting Amazon's sales.Jeffrey P. Bezos, the chief executive of Amazon, owns The Washington Post.[Some of the content in this entry could not be displayed on this device.]




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    Hillary Clinton, who defended her use of a private e-mail server by saying she only wanted to use one device for all her correspondence, actually used at least two devices: her regular mobile phone and an iPad.That's according to a report from the Associated Press, which reviewed Clinton's e-mails released by the State Department. There were only four messages to see. But it was enough for the AP to conclude that Clinton not only used an iPad to send e-mails — she mixed work and personal e-mails on the tablet, too."In reply to a message sent in September 2011 by adviser Huma Abedin to Clinton's personal email account … Clinton mistakenly replied with questions that appear to be about decorations," the AP writes. Clinton quickly wrote Abedin to apologize for the message, which was meant for somebody else. But then Clinton added: "Also, pls let me know if you got a reply from my ipad. I'm not sure replies go thru."The anecdote undercuts Clinton's argument for having a private, nongovernmental e-mail server. Weeks ago, she said that it seemed "easier to carry one device for my work… instead of two." The iPad revelation suggests that as secretary of state, Clinton sent work e-mail on more than one device. (Previously, Slate wrote about the many devices of Hillary Clinton, including an iPad mini and iPod.)Clinton's fundamental issue — having to juggle multiple phones — is a frustration she shares with many of us.I asked Deloitte, which publishes the annual Global Mobile Consumer Survey, how many people in the United States carry more than one phone with them. While their research on this question isn't freely available and doesn't break it down by country, Deloitte's response suggested that 1 in 5 people own or have ready access to multiple smartphones at a time. Four percent have access to three smartphones. And one percent uses five or more.We're not even counting tablets or other mobile devices at this point. Just smartphones. (These people must be gadget reviewers or rocket scientists or something.)Here's the detailed data they sent me:You can't conclude from these numbers that the multiple-smartphone users are all Washingtonians who have their digital lives separated on work BlackBerrys and personal iPhones. They just give you an idea about how common the frustration associated with the constant switching must be.Not all of us can be secretary of state. But if anything, that underscores how odd it is that Clinton felt compelled to have a separate e-mail server. If so many of us are forced to lug around a work and personal phone, why shouldn't she?Read more:Clinton also used iPad for email; mixed personal, work chatsHillary Clinton promised a new relationship with the media. She was kidding.Clinton: It ‘might have been smarter’ to use a State Dept. e-mail account




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    Welcome to Main Street Morning, The Washington Post’s daily collection of news affecting entrepreneurs, start-ups and small businesses, with a special focus on policy and government. Here’s what’s affecting my small business, my clients and other entrepreneurs today. Washington •  Former Federal Reserve chief Ben Bernanke launches his own blog. •  U.S. inflation has fallen short of the Fed’s two percent target for the 34th straight month. •  Congress is grappling over whether to grant President Obama authority to negotiate potentially lucrative trade deals that could be a boon for several states — such as South Dakota.  •  The Department of Commerce awards $10 million in grants to advance innovation. The Economy •  Consumer spending barely rises in February. •  Pending home sales give a hopeful sign for the U.S. housing market. •  These are the four things that are keeping small business owners up at night. Ideas •  Researchers have developed simple liquid metal machines that zip around if they “eat” aluminum and other substances that produce electrochemical reactions. Employees •   After Zayn Malik leaves One Direction, some heartbroken fans are asking their employers for time off to cope. •   After a news story is published, a minimum wage worker loses her job at a hotel. Management •  A marketing expert and CEO thinks that to run an airline you should first be required to run a small business. •  How a local bank in the Amish country has flourished amid a dearth of small lenders. •  What you need to know to expand your business internationally. •  Why people who are good at sports are not successful at business. •  Why I don’t want to have coffee with you (no offense). Marketing •  Some are wondering if the Guinness World Records can be trusted in light of its relationships with publicity-seeking companies. Retail •   Amazon launches a new service to help small businesses sell everything from an oil change to piano lessons. Cash Flow •  Insurance giant the Hartford reports that more than 40 percent of small businesses will experience a claim in the next 10 years. Customer Service •  The President and CEO of a social media sales and customer service company explains why text messaging is a customer service channel whose time has come. Technology •  Microsoft (MSFT) starts rolling out mobile device management to Office 365 business customers. •  This drone is surprisingly good at herding sheep. •  The top small business software for 2015. Travel •  A JetBlue (JBLU) network outage causes delays. Entrepreneurs •  A 10-year-old in Texas gets a pretty sweet investment for her booming lemonade business. •  An author’s breakout success is all the more surprising because her target audience is adults who like coloring books. •  There are a rising number of expat-reneurs.  Restaurants •  McDonalds is testing all-day breakfasts. Online •  Google’s Gmail service goes down for some users. •  Dex Media (DXM) and Yext extend and expand their five-year-old agreement to help small and medium-sized businesses enhance their Internet presence. Start-ups •  Venture money is flooding into Indian start-ups. •  A tech investor bets $100,000 that there’s a tech bubble.  •  A start-up lets you email digital photos directly to a picture frame. Around the Country •  Thieves rob an Oregon salon owner of its products…but leave the cash register full. •  An ultra-high-speed Internet and TV service wants to entice more upscale residents to central Detroit. Around the World •  China’s central bank chief said that the nation’s growth rate has tumbled “a bit” too much, underscoring forecasts for further monetary easing in the world’s second-largest economy. •  Amazon tests courier drones in Canada to avoid hassles in the U.S. •  Nest thermostats fail to account for British Summer Time. •  Global poverty is at its lowest rate in history. Gene Marks owns the Marks Group, a Bala Cynwyd, Pa., consulting firm that helps clients with customer relationship management. Follow Gene Marks and On Small Business on Twitter.  News we should know about? Email us here.




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    Shares of Red Hat (RHT) were falling 0.5% to $76.28 in mid-morning trading Tuesday. The software company announced new updates to its JBoss Data Virtualization and JBoss Data Grid enterprise products.

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    Weather forecasters get a bad rap for getting things wrong, but what if your insurance company had a forecast so accurate that it could send you an alert to move your car before a hailstorm destroyed your windshield?That's the promise IBM (IBM) sees for the Internet of Things -- the tech industry's term for embedding Internet sensors into appliances, cars and other everyday objects -- and its potential for collecting weather data.The company announced Tuesday that it's taking a $3 billion bet on the Internet of Things over the next four years, starting a new business unit based just on helping companies collect and make sense of massive sets of data. And to kick off the new unit, the company also announced that it will partner with the Weather Co., the owner of the Weather Channel, to show off how it can turn data into insights.The Internet of Things has been a focus for IBM (IBM) for quite a few years. Last year, the company announced that it would work with the mobile processing firm ARM to build a "starter kit" of sorts to let hobbyists make their own connected devices. It was also a founding member of the Industrial Internet Consortium -- along with AT&T (T), Cisco (CSCO), General Electric (GE) and Intel (INTC) -- which is focused on encouraging the development of Internet of Things projects for businesses and government.The new partnership should have applications for both the public and private sectors, said Mark Gildersleeve, president of the Weather Co.'s global business to business unit, known as the WSI Corporation. Gildersleeve said his company uses data from more than 10,000 sensors across the globe to generate 10 billion forecasts per day.Some of those sensors, he said, are placed by government entities such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Weather Service, while other data are collected by sensors embedded in vehicles, on buildings or through user-submitted information from smartphones. (That information is only collected from people who opt-in to Weather Channel programs, and is turned into anonymous data.)The goal of all that collection is to generate useful information for businesses and governments which, in turn, can help those entities make better decisions about when to cancel flights, postpone school days or respond to bad weather."It's not just a weather forecast," Gildersleeve said. "It becomes a tool to say how many staff a retailer should schedule for based on the weather, or for telling an insurer how many policy holders were in the line of a storm when it hit -- so they can quickly mobilize their customer response unit to handle claims."Glenn Finch, IBM's (IBM) lead for Big Data & Analytics, said weather information can often fly in the face of business owners' intuition -- and reveal surprising results.For example, Gildersleeve noted, it's no surprise that a rise in temperatures will prompt an increase in beer sales. But the Weather Co. has found that there's a stronger correlation between high temperatures and strong beer sales in Seattle than there is in Arizona.Why? That's not for the data to say, but that information could help store owners better understand how to stock their stores to keep up with the whims of the weather -- and to keep consumers from facing empty shelves."As the weather becomes more volatile -- which we have seen -- this becomes more important," Finch said. "Where I live [in Fairfax, Va.], we've seen we can have seven inches of snow, and next day it can be 75 degrees. If you're a retailer now, what do you do besides hope?"




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    A security company has discovered a computer spying campaign that it said "likely" originated with a government agency or political group in Lebanon, underscoring how far the capability for sophisticated computer espionage is spreading beyond the world's top powers.

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    Deal values the business at about $3.3 billion. Koninklijke Philips NV (PHG) has sold a majority stake in its light-emitting diode components and automotive-lighting activities to a private-equity consortium in a deal that values the business at about $3.3 billion. GO Scale Capital, an investment fund sponsored by GSR Ventures and Oak Investment Partners, said it would buy an 80.1% stake in the Philips LED components and automotive-lighting business in a deal which is expected to...

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    South Korean rivals Samsung Electronics Co Ltd and LG Electronics Inc said on Tuesday they have agreed to call off all their legal disputes including a bitter months-long conflict over a set of damaged washing machines.

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    Cuba, a few decades late to the Internet era, is committed to getting the web into 50 percent of its households by 2020, as well as achieving 60 percent mobile phone access, a senior U.S. State Department official said on Monday.

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    A federal judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit accusing Philip Falcone and his Harbinger Capital Partners LLC of misleading investors by taking a majority stake in wireless company LightSquared Inc without disclosing the investment or its risks.

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    With the proliferation of mobile devices, applications for social networking and messaging are growing their audiences faster than ever, with several racing to reach a billion users.Though smaller in total audience size than social app behemoths such as Facebook-owned WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger, ephemeral photo and video messaging app Snapchat is growing faster than the rest of the pack.

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    Shares of Oracle Corp. (ORCL) are higher by 2.06% to $43.52 in mid-afternoon trading on Monday, after the enterprise software and computer hardware products and services provider's rating was upgraded to "outperform" from "sector perform" at RBC Capital. The firm said it raised its rating on Oracle (NASDAQ-NMS:ORCL) based on its optimistic view regarding the company's cloud growth ability.

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    Updated to reflect fact WWE app has 17 million downloads, not WWE Network in the eighth paragraph. World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) is attracting more subscribers to its year-old WWE Network, but concerns about its ability to retain those followers is weighing heavily on investors.