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    It's finally happened. The North American organization responsible for handing out new IP addresses says its banks have run dry.That's right: ARIN, the American Registry for Internet Numbers, has had to turn down a request for the unique numbers that we assign to each and every smartphone, tablet and PC so they can talk to the Internet. For the first time, ARIN didn't have enough IP addresses left in its stock to satisfy an entire order — and now, it's activated the end-times protocol that will see the few remaining addresses out into the night.IP addresses are crucial to the operation of the Internet. They're the numbers behind URLs like "google.com" or "facebook.com." They identify every device that connects to the Web, from servers to connected cars. The original designers of the Internet thought they'd only need around 4 billion unique combinations, derived from the series of dots and digits that make up IP addresses everywhere.How wrong they were.By 2020, humanity will be living alongside 25 billion Internet-connected devices, according to Gartner (IT) researchers. The rising global demand for Web-enabled devices is far outstripping the original system's ability to keep up. Left, uh, unaddressed, this problem would have put a stranglehold on the Web, keeping it from growing. It would've kept you from using new devices like smartwatches or smart refrigerators. Entirely new technologies we haven't dreamt of might never have emerged. We'd have been stuck with the Internet that we now have, forever.If you haven't already guessed, we have a backup system in place so that Xboxes and Playstations of the future can continue to get online. Internet engineers have actually been anticipating this day for decades. To understand how they've solved it, let's let one of the original designers of the Internet explain:[Some of the content in this entry could not be displayed on this device.]The solution is known as IPv6, short for "version 6." It's an upgrade of the old IP numbering system, known as IPv4. While it won't replace the old system, it's considered the future of the Internet. It has to be, by necessity. At ARIN, large requests for IPv4 addresses will now be subject to rationing or waitlisting."The number of days remaining before depletion are dwindling," wrote Richard Jimmerson, ARIN's chief information officer, in a blog post Thursday. "It is very likely that we are already processing a request that we will be unable to fulfill."Some companies, such as Google (GOOG), flipped the switch on IPv6 in 2012, and the number of devices, Web sites and Internet providers using IPv6 has been growing.Not every company has made the jump yet — it takes more elbow grease and money than not doing anything at all. But the switch is inevitable. We've already passed the point where Internet-connected devices outnumber people, and the original system is at its breaking point.Luckily, IPv6 offers 340 trillion trillion trillion possible unique combinations. Hopefully this will last us a while.






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    Mexico's telecoms regulator said on Thursday that a new tender process for digital TV channels will begin in the last quarter of 2015, and the winner will be announced in the first half of 2016. The step comes after the regulator in April revoked the awarding of a new TV network to media group Grupo Radio Centro, which failed to pay the sum required to secure it.

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    Cuba has opened 35 Wi-Fi access points nationwide, offering unprecedented online access in a country that until now has restricted use of the Internet to an elite few. Before the Wi-Fi signals became available on Wednesday, broadband Internet access had been limited to largely to desktops at state Internet parlors and pricey hotels. "It was high time for Cuba to be able to connect.

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    The threat of a hack is among banks' biggest fears. And those threats are becoming more frequent, and more sophisticated, according to a report released Thursday by the U.S. "Depository institutions are estimated to have incurred hundreds of millions of dollars in losses from breaches in the systems of their corporate customers that allowed criminals to illegally transfer funds from the customer's bank accounts, and from frauds perpetrated against their automated teller...

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    Welcome to Main Street Morning, The Washington Post’s daily collection of news affecting entrepreneurs, start-ups and small businesses with a special focus on policy and government.Here’s what’s affecting my small business my clients and other entrepreneurs today.WashingtonYou can now take photos (and tweet them!) on your next White House tour.The White House’s proposed overtime policy could hurt small businesses, trade groups say.The Export-Import Bank’s charter has expired for the first time since its founding.The Affordable Care Act is causing younger, healthier to get health insurance. The EconomyU.S. construction spending rises to a six-and-a-half year high.A report predicts slow economic growth for the Midwest and Plains states.Job creation by private companies is heating up this summer.U.S. franchise job gains bounced back and the U.S. private sector added 237,000 jobs last month.U.S. debt could be headed towards Greek levels.A key manufacturing index went up in June.Chrysler tops Ford in latest retail numbers.The ElectionsMacy’s cuts its ties with Donald Trump.Hillary Clinton raises a record $45 million in first half of her campaign.Twitter pounces on Chris Christie’s hilarious hashtag fail.PeopleVirtual internships could be your new solution for hiring millennials.On-demand mailing service Shyp plans to now classify its couriers as employees and not contractors.A Silicon Valley start-up explains why it’s ditching freelancers. ManagementFive phrases that signal you’re about to make a bad decision.How to find potential business partners when you’re a “nobody.”The ADP-Zenefits fiasco is a lesson in how partners break bad.ProductivityIf you lack inspiration then get yourself to a Maker Faire.EntrepreneursThe case for becoming a data-driven entrepreneur.Why it’s so hard to be an entrepreneur.Ellen DeGeneres launches a lifestyle brand.Why Kim Kardashian is everything that’s right about America.RetailA business owner claims that construction at a local Walmart trapped her at work.RestaurantsDunkin’ Donuts is phasing out styrofoam cups.How the proposed overtime pay changes could affect your restaurant.FinanceSweetgreen raises more lettuce to continue its expansion.After supporting the inclusion of transgender girls, the Girl Scouts’ crowdfunding campaign hits $250K.An employee expense management software company raises $100 million.Sales & MarketingA serial entrepreneur explains how to take an idea and match it with a market need.This is the value of super-users for your brand.Start-UpsThese are killer marketing strategies that will make your start-up look like an established brand.TechnologyOffice 365 enterprise users can now broadcast to 10,000 people at once.Colleges and tech firms are joining forces to try to make campus life safer.OnlineThese are the best small business blogs of 2015.Buying .sucks domains is a ridiculous exercise in futility.CBS launches a site to help small businesses.Social MediaFacebook tweaks its logo for first time in 10 years.OpportunitiesA former prison is for sale.Around the CountrySomeone is breaking into underground vaults in California to sever major internet cables.A Massachusetts contractor is ordered to pay $125,000 for violating wage laws.A long-time business owner in Albuquerque is revamping a problem shopping center.Delaware is the only state without commercial air travel.A suburb of Detroit is offering free Uber rides to jurors to and from the courthouse.Around the WorldGlobal factory growth eases.After 50 years, the U.S. is re-establishing an embassy in Cuba.GM halts production at its single assembly plant in Russia amid plummeting salesGreece isn’t the first nation to default on a sovereign debt.Gene Marks owns the Marks Group,  a Bala Cynwyd  PA  consulting firm that helps clients with customer relationship management. Follow Gene Marks and On Small Business on Twitter.News we should know about? Email us here.






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    YouTube (GOOG) was a video dating sitehttps:// youtu.be/jNQXAC9IVRwNow the most popular video sharing site on the Internet, YouTube (GOOG) at first seemed anything but destined for future success. It launched on Valentine’ s Day 2005 as a video dating site with the unofficial slogan“ Tune In, Hook Up.” However, the company’ s founders admit that the original idea never took off as...

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    The following are mergers under. APPROVALS AND WITHDRAWALS. -- China National Chemical Corp to acquire Italian tyre maker Pirelli. NEW LISTINGS. -- U.S. healthcare company Danaher Corp (DHR) to acquire air and water filter maker Pall Corp (PLL). -- Swiss travel retailer Dufry to acquire Italian peer World Duty Free.

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    The European Union's second highest court on Thursday found a shareholder loan given to France Telecom, now named Orange, was not state aid and therefore was legal. The decision overturns a 2004 finding by the European Commission that the loan was incompatible with EU law.

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    Tesla Motors (TSLA) shares were moving higher in early trade after the electric vehicle maker said it delivered 11,507 Model S vehicles in the second quarter, a new company record. The results, released this morning, represent an increase of 52% year-over-year, when it delivered 7,579 vehicles in the second quarter of 2014.

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    This story, originally published July 2, has been updated to clarify some details and add comment from AT&T (T) and others.NEW YORK--AT&T's (T) stock has been rising lately in anticipation of its acquisition of DirectTV, while investors have been dumping rival Verizon (VZ), But it's unclear how long the different performances in the two stocks may last.

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    British electrical goods and mobile phone retailer Dixons Carphone said its Connected World Services division has signed a deal with Sprint Corp. (S), the U.S. mobile network operator, to open and manage Sprint-branded stores in the U.S.. Dixons Carphone, formed last year from the merger of Dixons Retail and Carphone Warehouse, said the first phase of the deal will see CWS supply mobile phone reta...

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    Israeli defence electronics firm Elbit Systems Ltd (ESLT) said on Thursday a subsidiary won a contract worth $150 million from the Dutch Ministry of Defence to supply advanced systems for infantry soldiers in the Benelux countries. The contract will be carried out over five years.

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    Dixons Carphone Plc. * Connected World Services signs agreement with Sprint Corporation (S) to open U.S. stores. * To open and manage a significant number of Sprint-branded stores in U.S. * In the initial phase, Dixons Carphone will supply mobile phone retail expertise and proprietary knowledge to Sprint (S) who will open approximately 20 retail stores.

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    Xiaomi Inc on Thursday said it sold 34.7 million smartphones in the first six months of 2015, casting doubt on the ability of China's most valuable tech startup to achieve its full-year target. Chief Executive Lei Jun last year spoke of reaching 100 million shipments in 2015 but in recent months has revised the figure to a more conservative range of 80 million to 100 million.

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    Facebook (FB) jumped Wednesday after receiving a price target increase ahead of its earnings. Read More: 11 Safe High-Yield Dividend Stocks for Times of Volatility and Uncertainty. The social media giant got a boost after a Cantor Fitzgerald analyst increased its price target to $100 from $92.

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    Way back in 1999, an executive from Lucent Technologies named Carly Fiorina was recruited to be CEO of Hewlett-Packard (HPQ). The board of HP—that granddaddy of Silicon Valley companies—brought her in to help transform the lagging computer maker. She tried to do just that, slashing headcount, shaking up how the venerable old company worked, and embarking on a massive controversial merger with Compaq despite opposition from one of the company founder’s sons. Ultimately, Fiorina’s flashy style was seen by many as a poor match, and the merger’s results were underwhelming. She was out of a job by early 2005.In the years since, her tenure has been repeatedly held up as evidence of what can go wrong when an outsider is brought in to deliver a jolt of change. And it’s likely to get even more attention in the coming months, as Fiorina, who's now campaigning as a 2016 presidential contender, runs both on her record at the top of Corporate America—and against it.But Fiorina is just one of many examples of a company thinking its salvation rests in the hands of an outside savior. After Fiorina, HP has turned more than once to outsiders, including SAP’s Leo Apoetheker, who lasted just 11 months. Activist investor Bill Ackman tried to solve JC Penney’s retail woes by bringing in Ron Johnson, the high-profile former head of Apple’s stores, who adopted radical pricing changes that the department store's customers didn’t like. Even more recently, Juniper Networks (JNPR) recruited an outsider for its top post, only to see him last less than a year before replacing him with a longtime veteran.When will they ever learn? Despite years of failures, far too many boards and activist investors continue to desperately try to land outside superstar CEOs. Driven by preventable succession crises, they bring people in at enormous costs who are often completely ill-equipped to run the businesses they’re supposed to rescue.There are signs companies may be smartening up.  In 2014, 22 percent of incoming S&P 500 chief executives were recruited from outside the organization’s own ranks, according to the latest figures from The Conference Board. That is slightly down from the most recent peak of 27 percent, which was reached in 2012.And yet it’s still far above historical figures. In the 1970s, just 8 percent of S&P 500 CEOs weren’t groomed in-house.[Former IBM chief Sam Palmisano on why he thinks companies should groom their own CEOs.]Few topics related to CEO succession arouse as much debate as the perennial question of whether outsiders or insiders are the answer to transforming companies. Some corporate governance experts and management watchers are vehement fans of homegrown leaders. Others are agnostic, believing every situation is different. Still others staunchly believe only a fresh-eyed outsider can bring deep and fundamental change to a company. That’s particularly so when the business model is under threat or the existing regime has been so discredited that even the best insiders are tainted by association.After decades of advising CEOs and boards, it’s my belief that every outsider selection—no matter how much it's portrayed as a coup in the press or pumped up by executive recruiters—is in reality the archetype of failure.Bringing in an outsider (even an outsider who goes on to succeed) is evidence that the board, the CEO and the chief of human resources didn’t perform the first responsibility of their jobs: building a leadership pipeline that produces ready leaders at all levels of the organization.That doesn’t mean all outsiders will fail. Hardly. Searching around for a CEO may be advisable or even inevitable when a company finds itself in desperate straits. That was certainly the case when Alan Mulally was recruited from Boeing (BA) to Ford, or when Honeywell’s board brought in David Cote, who has engineered a turnaround at the former laggard.Yet despite their success, recruiting outsiders is the result of a critical failure to nurture and develop new leaders within one’s own organization. This sorry state of succession planning and leadership development has several culprits. One is due to CEOs who aren’t ready to pass the baton, and therefore don’t do enough to make it a priority. Another is that boards, CEOs and outside consultants focus too much attention on the creation of a plan that may look good on paper, but fails when put to the test. Finally, there is far too little attention paid to the succession process, and the relationships between the three major players in this drama: the CEO, the CHRO (chief human resource officer) and the board of directors. When companies get it right, it’s usually because those three have effectively collaborated on their leadership development programs, dress-rehearsing internal candidates for the job by providing them with tough assignments to manage real business lines. Plenty of evidence points in favor of insiders. According to an article in the research service Agenda, internal candidates hired last year as CEOs at S&P 500 companies saw an average share price growth of 5.2 percent in their first six months, compared to 2.5 percent for their externally hired counterparts.Other research has shown that early strategic changes made by insiders tend to fare better than changes made by outsiders, as well as that outsiders were nearly seven times more likely than insiders to be dismissed with a short tenure.Bringing in outsiders can also blow up a company’s carefully developed compensation structure, as they may require pricey signing bonuses or stock grants to make up for what they’re leaving behind elsewhere. Charlie Tharp, executive vice president of the HR Policy Association and CEO of its Center on Executive Compensation, has conducted research on the pay costs of bringing in outsiders. He told me in an interview I conducted for my book that a great deal of public consternation over excessive executive pay could have been prevented if only CEOs, CHROs and boards had been doing their jobs.“What’s really generating such great public outrage,” he said in the interview, “is the increasing popularity of high-profile external hires, which in turn is raising the cost of internal successors as well.”Reaching outside for a savior CEO may work fine sometimes, or even result in great performance every once in a while. But no one would consider either one evidence of a strong team or a good strategy. When it comes to planning for the next CEO, boards should focus less on finding a superstar from the outside—one who is often riskier, costlier and far more disruptive—and more on guiding a process that ensures it has the right bench of well-groomed veterans who’ve been cultivated from the inside.Noel Tichy is a professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business and the author of Succession: Mastering the Make-or-Break Art of Leadership Transition.Read also:IBM is struggling. But former CEO Sam Palmisano says he isn't looking back.Unilever CEO says he is 'ashamed' of his pay and has the company's 'simplest job'Like On Leadership? Follow us on Facebook (FB) and Twitter, and subscribe to our podcast on iTunes.