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    Depending upon whom you ask, Apple (AAPL) may have a Watch issue. In a research note primarily discussing the iPhone, Pacific Crest Securities analyst Andy Hargreaves noted that sales of the Apple Watch aren't as strong as initially estimated, with demand appearing to slow quickly. "In contrast to iPhone, anecdotal evidence suggests Apple Watch demand is slowing quickly," Hargreaves wrote in a note.

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    * BMW says regularly talks to telecoms, IT firms. * Talks are not about car development or production. * BMW open to partnerships, production chief says. BMW is open to building cars for other companies such as Google or Apple (AAPL), the automaker's production chief said on Wednesday, adding that there are currently no such talks.

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    Shares of AT&T Inc  were slightly down 0.01% to $35.51 in early market trading Wednesday, despite getting a price target boost by analysts at Oppenheimer this morning. The firm raised its price target on shares of the telecommunications company to $40 from $36, noting that AT&T's cross selling and new services can drive improved free cash flow growth.

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    Silicon Valley is the traditional mecca for aspiring technology professionals, but job seekers who want to settle down in one of tomorrow's tech capitals should look to the South, the Northeast and other cities in the West, according to the latest report from online job board and researcher ZipRecruiter.

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    The Donald is fighting back. Donald Trump, the real-estate developer and sometime TV personality, said he's filed a $500 million lawsuit in New York State Supreme Court against Spanish-language Univision, claiming it violated its contract and is required to broadcast the Miss USA pageant live on TV.

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    SoftBank Group Corp said on Wednesday it had hired former LinkedIn Corp executive Deep Nishar as managing director of investments as the Japanese telecoms conglomerate targets growth overseas to counter a shrinking domestic market. Nishar will be based in San Carlos, California, and report to SoftBank President Nikesh Arora, it said in a statement.

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    BMW is open to building cars for other companies such as Google or Apple (AAPL), the automaker's production chief said on Wednesday. "We live in a world of partnerships," Oliver Zipse said in response to a question about whether BMW could imagine building a car for a software or computer company such as Apple.

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    South Africa's government has sold its 13.91 percent stake in mobile phone firm Vodacom to the Public Investment Corporation to raise 23 billion rand in funding for power utility Eskom, the Treasury said on Wednesday.

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    South Africa's government has sold its stake in mobile telephone company Vodacom to the Public Investment Corporation to finance a 23 billion rand allocation to cash strapped power utility Eskom, the Treasury said on Wednesday.

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    Tonight the U.S. women's soccer team will play before another packed stadium as it challenges Germany for a spot in this year's World Cup final. Arguably, its biggest fan won't be in the stands but behind the camera.Must Read: Greece Crisis Has Yet to Create Buying Opportunity in U.S. Stocks.

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    A nearly two-month bidding war for Integrated Silicon Solution (ISSI) has crossed the finish line as the chip maker's shareholders signaled their support for a tie-up with China's Uphill Investment Co. ISSI announced on Monday after the markets closed that its shareholders had approved an acquisition by Uphill for $23 per share in cash, or about $730.5 million.

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    What does a centuries-old whiskey company have to do with the Internet?A lot, it turns out. You don't often see bourbon makers rubbing elbows with telecom regulators, but Jim Beam made an exception this week when it sent a letter to the Federal Communications Commission arguing that the agency needs to ensure that high-speed Internet remains plentiful, competitive and cheap."In our 200 years in operation, Jim Beam has learned a thing or two about the three 'b's,' bourbon, brands and business," the company wrote in a letter to the FCC.Now the company says it's adding a fourth "B" to the list: Broadband. From Jim Beam's Illinois headquarters to its Kentucky distilleries and restaurants, high-speed Internet is integral to the company's business. It uses smaller Internet providers in many of these facilities that might be threatened by larger carriers seeking to edge out the competition, Jim Beam says. So the company is pressing the FCC to make broadband competition a priority.Jim Beam's letter to the FCC continues:Broadband plays a role in supplying ingredients for production, orders, stocking, and shipping. At our headquarters we have staffing, hiring, accounting and financial management needs. But we also rely on heavy bandwidth to review large art and video concept files, which form the core of our advertising campaigns. We also require seamless voice and video conferencing services to coordinate with our coworkers and partners in France and Japan.We've written a bit before about the transition Jim Beam references. The nation is currently shifting away from old, copper-wire networks toward next-generation, high-speed fiber optic networks that can handle voice calls as just another kind of data — similar to the voice chats you might have on Google Hangouts or on Skype. In general, fiber is the future: It can handle download speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second, which is around 100 times faster than the current national average.What Jim Beam is hinting at here, though it doesn't say it explicitly, is that large Internet providers stand to benefit a great deal from this transition, while smaller carriers could get left behind or squeezed out. And if that happens, it could hurt longstanding American brands like Jim Beam.The chairman of the FCC, Tom Wheeler, has previously argued that there's a lack of meaningful competition in high-speed Internet, saying much of the country is dominated by a "duopoly" that gives people few choices.Read the full letter here.




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    Mexico's telecoms regulator said on Tuesday that it will open access to the "last mile" of Telmex telephone network to rivals, in a decision that aims to increase competition in a sector dominated by billionaire Carlos Slim. The move will force Telmex, owned by Slim's America Movil, to let other companies use part of its vast fixed line infrastructure.