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    A nearly two-month bidding war for Integrated Silicon Solution (ISSI) crossed the finish line after the chipmaker's shareholders signaled their support for a tie-up with China's Uphill Investment Co. ISSI announced Monday after the markets closed its shareholders had approved an acquisition by Uphill for $23 per share in cash, or about $730.5 million.

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    When Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos sent Amit Agarwal to spearhead the company's entry into India, Bezos' message was clear -- India is a big deal for Amazon (AMZN). Agrawal, who's vice president and country manager of Amazon India, was once one of Bezos' "shadows," an esteemed position held by Bezos' closest employees who tend to end up in some of the most important roles in the company.

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    When was the last time you memorized a phone number?No really, think about it. Besides your own number, how many can you even remember by heart now?It's probably fewer than you'd like -- and you're not alone. Out of more than 1,000 American's surveyed for a report from cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab released Wednesday, more than half said they couldn't recall the phone numbers of their friends and neighbors. And 44 percent said they couldn't remember their sibling's numbers.But why would they? What's the point of filling your head with phone numbers if they're all stored in a smartphone that's with you almost all the time?So instead, we're replacing the ability to recall specifics with the certainty that we have them stored somewhere or can look them up online later -- a sort of digital amnesia. In fact, more than 90 percent of those surveyed for the Kaspersky report agreed that "they use the Internet as an online extension of their brain."Of course, this isn't just about phone numbers. Rote memorization was once a staple of modern education: Students were taught the names of the presidents in order and all the names of state capitals -- or even to draw a map of the United States from memory like Senator Al Franken (D-Minn.).But now, that information is just a click or swipe away. And that's making us worse at remembering things, according to academic research on the topic.One journal article, published in Science in 2011, found that when people expect to have access to information online they are less likely to remember the actual facts, but more likely to remember how to find them.In effect, we are already becoming one with the machine: "We are becoming symbiotic with our computer tools, growing into interconnected systems that remember less by knowing information than by knowing where the information can be found," according to the Science article.That's not necessarily a bad thing -- maybe it gives us more mental processing power to think through things. And we certainly have access to more knowledge now than ever, even if it's not all stored in our brains.But there are risks to this brave new world of memory outsourcing beyond losing our ability to recall who the 15th President was. (James Buchanan, just in case you were about to Google (GOOG) it.)That kind of information may always be a click away, but the important things -- the personal things, like way your mom smiled at your wedding -- you want to remember might be harder to recall or find online. And if you're relying on your own archive of pictures or documents to keep track of those memories, the consequences of a lost, stolen or hacked hard drive are much more meaningful.




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    Shares of Corning are advancing 0.05% to $19.74 on Wednesday after the company today introduced EDGE8 solutions, its latest optical cabling innovation for data centers and storage area networks. EDGE8 is the industry's first modular, tip-to-tip optical cabling system to feature an eight fiber cabling design, according to Corning.

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    Sprint (S) chief executive Marcelo Claure says he was sleeping in Tokyo when he missed the huge public backlash against his company Tuesday over its policy to slow down video speeds on its new All-in plans.Now, Claure has reversed course, saying hours later that Sprint (S) won't make customers' streaming videos unbearably slow on its network.The kerfuffle arose when sharp-eyed folks looked through the fine print for Sprint's All-in plan, which is designed to simplify the experience of shopping for a cell service provider. For $80 a month — $20 a month for the phone and $60 a month for unlimited talk, text and data — the new plan promises consumers one single price with no extra or hidden fees (except for taxes and activation fees).But buried in the deal was a clause that said Sprint (S) would be throttling online video, a particularly data-intensive service. Video speeds at all times would be slowed to 600 Kbps, little better than what you'd get on dial-up, the company said in its fine print.That prompted outcries from angry consumers.@marceloclaure how did anyone in your company thought that was a good idea? 600 kps limit?? We live in 2015 smh Not '1992'Sprint (S) quickly backtracked."We heard you loud and clear, and we are removing the 600 kbps limitation on streaming video," said Claure in a statement and in a tweet. He added, however, that "during certain times … we might have to manage the network in order to reduce congestion."It's not clear what "manage the network" means, particularly since Sprint (S) voluntarily said it would no longer be slowing the mobile Internet for unlimited data customers. If Sprint (S) is saying it won't throttle the Internet — a vow that now applies to streaming video — what else could it be planning?I've asked Sprint (S) for clarification, and I'll update if and when I hear anything.Update: Sprint (S) says its two-year-old policy on slowing down streaming video will be ending for all of its postpaid customers, not just those on All-in plans, but a company spokesperson declined to elaborate on the "standard network management practices" that will be used by the firm. Below is a list of all current and expired plans that were affected by the slow video speeds (now no longer, as a result of Claure's announced policy change).






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    Welcome to Main Street Morning, The Washington Post’s daily collection of news affecting entrepreneurs, start-ups and small businesses with a special focus on policy and government.Here’s what’s affecting my small business my clients and other entrepreneurs today.WashingtonHere’s who will benefit the most from the new overtime rules.The Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling could have major tax and financial planning implicationsThe EconomyConsumer confidence jumped again in June.Spending for the July 4th holiday is up.The ElectionsChris Christie opens his 2016 campaign. This is his record on small business.Here’s an incredible video of Ted Cruz doing “The Simpsons” impressions.RestaurantsConsumer visits to restaurants have declined in all but a few countries, according to the latest research.Despite making inroads over the past several decades, women still face hurdles for advancement in the restaurant industry.Start-UpsE-cigarettes are a controversial but profitable sector for start-ups.Uber documents show huge losses.A health insurance platform for small companies raises almost $6 million. Start-up figures out how to waste less mayonnaise. PeopleThis hilarious chart shows why you can’t get anything done at workOnlinePinterest has started rolling out buyable pins on the iPhone and iPad.FinanceHere are a few secrets for cash flow success from a few experts.MarketingA chief marketing officer says data is the secret to modern marketing.EntrepreneursAn entrepreneur shares her year of working dangerously after resigning from a secure job.Meet the man who is a professional sober coach.Three ways introverted entrepreneurs can market themselves.An entrepreneur who faced depression, debt and failure shares how he managed to pick himself up and keep going even when the odds were stacked against himOpportunitiesCan you guess which small business industry is growing the fastest?How to expand your business overseas.TechnologyThe strong dollar is predicted to be the cause of a $200 billion drop in 2015 tech spending.Amazon Web Services is building a massive data center in India.Apple is told to pay $450 million in an e-book price-fixing suit.Payment service Square adds payroll to its ever-expanding offerings for small businesses.These are the best cheap laptops under $250.Around the CountryThe Girl Scouts of Western Washington turned down a $100,000 donation after the donor made a startling request.A young entrepreneur gives Baltimore houses a new lifeline.A German entrepreneur patents the word ‘”Grexit” for a vodka drink.Some small business owners in Burien, Washington said they are having trouble opening or expanding in part because of parking requirement set by city code.Around The WorldGreece officially defaults and the IMF says austerity measures would still leave the country with unsustainable debt.Meanwhile, Greek small business owners face worried customers and an uncertain future.In mid-2017, Europeans will no longer face roaming charges when they make mobile phone calls anywhere within the European Union.An AirBnB home in Australia is turned into a brothel.The U.S. and Brazil increase their ties on trade and climate.Gene Marks owns the Marks Group,  a Bala Cynwyd  PA  consulting firm that helps clients with customer relationship management. Follow Gene Marks and On Small Business on Twitter.News we should know about? Email us here.






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    Starting today thirsty residents in San Francisco and Oakland can get a 7-Eleven slurpee delivered straight to their apartment thanks to delivery startup Postmates. Postmates, which has raised $138 million in seven rounds of funding, wants to be your deliveryman.

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    Macy's (M) action comes as the retailer is seeking to boost sales and better attract Latino shoppers through clothing lines such as Thalia, named for the Mexican film and music superstar Thalia Sodi.Trump swung back at Macy's (M), charging that the retailer backs illegal immigration and that he never liked having his products manufactured in China.

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    How to create savvy consumers who are less likely to take on debt and more prone to saving? Some consumer groups say the key is to start young, very young.That was the main message from a council tasked with coming up with ideas for improving the financial habits of young consumers. The group presented the recommendations to the White House and Treasury Department on Tuesday.Teaching children about money as early as kindergarten topped the list. Helping people open bank accounts and manage money as soon as they start earning cash might also help to lock in good financial habits, the council found. And young people need to be better educated about their options before they go to college and start taking out student loans, the group said.“We feel very strongly that it’s just like learning a language or learning math or learning science,” said John W. Rogers Jr., chair of the council and chief executive of Ariel Investments. “The earlier you start, the more effective you’ll be.”The group highlighted some promising programs that are already in place and some new programs that may serve as models down the line. Some efforts focus on making teachers more confident in personal finance topics so they can pass the knowledge on to their students.Many of the programs aimed to teach people good money habits by having them manage actual cash. For instance, teens earning money from a summer job may get better at managing their spending if they open a bank account and get some financial coaching.One initiative from Operation HOPE, a nonprofit focused on improving credit scores for low-income families, asks kids to pitch their business ideas in “Shark Tank” style competition. The winners get $500, but only if they open a bank account and work with a mentor to start a business plan and a budget.The research report notes:When young people receive their first paycheck, they are primed to learn more about money management and have a unique opportunity to make a timely and informed choice about their new income.The results might be more lasting and go beyond the bank account when savings are for a specific goal. Separate research from the Corporation for Enterprise Development found that children with $500 or less saved for college were three times more likely to enroll in college and four times more likely to graduate.Recommendations from the council also focused on the crucial decisions young people make as they head to college, such as applying for student loans and taking out credit cards. The council called for further simplifying the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) and creating a group of volunteers and online tools that can guide students through the process.Members said government agencies should do more to make students aware of the more affordable options available to them when it comes to paying for college. School officials should make sure young people know about affordable payment plans once they graduate.Of course, it’s difficult to grasp the impact of stock movements and the inverse relationship between bond yields and bond prices at any age. But teachers might make it easier for people to understand more complex matters in adulthood if they can introduce certain concepts early on, the argument goes.Think about little children playing a game with jelly beans that gives them a basic understanding of the power of compound interest, says Nan Morrison, chief executive of the Council for Economic Education, an organization that advocates for expanding financial education.The council, created two years ago by the president, was made up of members from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Department of Education and nonprofit groups focused on financial education.Read More:What age is best to start drawing Social Security benefits? Truth is, it depends.A quarter of Americans are one emergency away from financial ruinOne way to keep kids from feeling entitled: Hide the wealth






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    Depending upon whom you ask, Apple (AAPL) may have a Watch issue. In a research note primarily discussing the iPhone, Pacific Crest Securities analyst Andy Hargreaves noted that sales of the Apple Watch aren't as strong as initially estimated, with demand appearing to slow quickly. "In contrast to iPhone, anecdotal evidence suggests Apple Watch demand is slowing quickly," Hargreaves wrote in a note.

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    * BMW says regularly talks to telecoms, IT firms. * Talks are not about car development or production. * BMW open to partnerships, production chief says. BMW is open to building cars for other companies such as Google or Apple (AAPL), the automaker's production chief said on Wednesday, adding that there are currently no such talks.

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    Shares of AT&T Inc  were slightly down 0.01% to $35.51 in early market trading Wednesday, despite getting a price target boost by analysts at Oppenheimer this morning. The firm raised its price target on shares of the telecommunications company to $40 from $36, noting that AT&T's cross selling and new services can drive improved free cash flow growth.

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    Silicon Valley is the traditional mecca for aspiring technology professionals, but job seekers who want to settle down in one of tomorrow's tech capitals should look to the South, the Northeast and other cities in the West, according to the latest report from online job board and researcher ZipRecruiter.

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    The Donald is fighting back. Donald Trump, the real-estate developer and sometime TV personality, said he's filed a $500 million lawsuit in New York State Supreme Court against Spanish-language Univision, claiming it violated its contract and is required to broadcast the Miss USA pageant live on TV.

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    SoftBank Group Corp said on Wednesday it had hired former LinkedIn Corp executive Deep Nishar as managing director of investments as the Japanese telecoms conglomerate targets growth overseas to counter a shrinking domestic market. Nishar will be based in San Carlos, California, and report to SoftBank President Nikesh Arora, it said in a statement.

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    BMW is open to building cars for other companies such as Google or Apple (AAPL), the automaker's production chief said on Wednesday. "We live in a world of partnerships," Oliver Zipse said in response to a question about whether BMW could imagine building a car for a software or computer company such as Apple.