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    Software developer Apigee Corp said its initial public offering has been priced at $17 per share, the midpoint of an expected range of $16-$18. The price means the company will raise about $87 million from the IPO of 5.1 million shares, and values the whole firm at about $494.5 million.

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    Mexican broadcaster Televisa, the world's biggest provider of Spanish-language TV content, on Thursday reported a 70 percent increase in its first-quarter net profit, reflecting a one-time payment from Univision. The company reported a net profit of 1.453 billion pesos, up from 853.9 million pesos in the same quarter a year earlier.

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    Friday is the official launch date of the Apple Watch, marking the first day that the devices should show up on doorsteps and non-celebrity wrists -- though not in any Apple Store.Apple's entire stock of watches sold out in less than six hours, and all the company's models now carry shipping estimates of June or beyond. But even if you were among the Apple faithful who woke up (or stayed awake) in the wee hours of the morning to pre-order the watch within its first 10 or 15 minutes of sale, there's no guarantee that you'll be sporting a new accessory Friday.And that's making some of Apple's most loyal fans -- often the company's fiercest defenders -- not very happy at all.[Read: Americans bought an estimated 1 million Apple Watches in 6 hours]As 9-to-5 Mac and MacRumors (plus a reader or two in my inbox) have reported, there are several people who ordered Apple Watches early enough to get an initial shipping estimate of "April 24 - May 8" who have yet to receive any notification that their watches are on the way. That seemed particularly perplexing given that others report that Apple is running a bit ahead of schedule. Some customers who initially resigned themselves to shipping dates as late as "June" say they have already received e-mails from Apple indicating that their watches are "preparing for shipment."In a statement, Apple confirmed that it was moving some shipping dates up and working to meet all orders in their promised time frames.“We’re happy to be updating many customers today with the news that their Apple Watch will arrive sooner than expected," the company said in a statement. "Our team is working to fill orders as quickly as possible based on the available supply and the order in which they were received. We know many customers are still facing long lead times and we appreciate their patience.”[Read: Almost no one camped out for the Apple Watch. That’s exactly what Apple wants.]Apple has certainly made it clear that it's looking for a different audience. It even eschewed the campouts and long lines that have become signatures of its product launches. That was in part to play up the luxury appeal of the Watch as not only a piece of technology but also a piece of jewelry. Apple's retail chief, former Burberry chief executive Angela Ahrendts, made it very clear in the run-up to the launch and in leaked memos to retail staff that she wanted this launch to appeal to a different sort of clientele."They are taking a leaf out of the luxury devices playbook," said IDC analyst Ramon Llamas. "If you're going to be getting a Tag Heuer or a Rolex, you can't just roll into a store. You make an appointment. It's not a surprise that this is not showing up in your Best Buys, or the [wireless] carrier stores."There are some stores where you will be able to pick up an Apple Watch on Friday, but they aren't Apple's. At Friday's launch, the watch will show up in boutiques such as "colette in Paris, Dover Street Market in London and Tokyo, Maxfield in Los Angeles and The Corner in Berlin," according to Apple.The question, however, is whether Apple's efforts to broaden its base will alienate their most faithful customers -- those more concerned with gadgetry than pageantry. Those folks, after all, are still the ones most likely to pick up the watch now, no matter what the future may hold.The new strategy, said Gartner (IT) analyst Van Baker, is a gamble -- and one that, in his opinion, hasn't been successful. "I think this is a grand experiment for Apple, and I wouldn’t say it has gone well," he said. "Whether this will have a lasting impact on the sales of the product or on Apple’s reputation with its most loyal customers remains to be seen, but I think there is a lot of room for improvement."Read more:Video: Trying out Apple’s $17,000 'Gold' watchHere’s what an Apple Watch appointment is likeVideo: Wearable tech goes beyond fitness




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    * Announcement could come as soon as Friday -source. * FCC's strong stance seen as big factor -sources. * Internet service, online video key competitive issues. By Liana B. Baker, Alina Selyukh and Diane Bartz.

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    Comcast Corp's board was meeting late on Thursday to finalize plans to abandon its proposed $45 billion merger with Time Warner Cable Inc, according to a person directly familiar with the matter. An announcement is expected as early as Friday, the person added, asking not to be identified because the deliberations are confidential.

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    Mexican broadcaster Televisa, the world's biggest provider of Spanish-language TV content, on Thursday reported a 70 percent increase in its first-quarter net profit on a one-time payment it received from Univision. The company reported a net profit of 1.453 billion pesos, up from 853.9 million pesos in the same quarter a year earlier.

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    When Indiana passed a “religious freedom” law last month, state business leadersexpressedconcern about whether the rule would hurt their bottom lines.In the Virginia governor’s mansion, a certain set of gray eyebrows perked up.The tension in Indiana was just the opening that Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) needed. The former banker and serial businessman got on the phone and called eight or nine of the companies that publicly lamented the law.“Where a major company says I’m unhappy with something or I don’t want to be here anymore or I’m not going to expand, I see that. That’s open fishing for me,” McAuliffe said. “I get my rod and my reel, and I get out there.”He could use a big haul. Despite his occasional assertions that the state’s economy is “booming,” a year into his governorship McAuliffe is overseeing an economy in which its largest employer by far, the Defense Department, has been battered by cutbacks.Overall, 13 of the top 20 employers in the state are public agencies or contractors dependent on public spending — a troubling over-reliance on the government for jobs.In Northern Virginia, county budgets are suffering from write-downs of commercial property values as near-record office vacancies pile up. In Arlington County, officials closed the money-losing Artisphere complex and put nearly $1 million of the money saved into economic development efforts.Given those troubling indicators, and with his top legislative priority dashed in Richmond, McAuliffe in January reworked his objectives to accentuate economic development, an arena in which he could unleash his relentless — some would say obsessive — appetite to make a deal.He takes prospects on nighttime tours of the state capital. To woo a craft brewing company to Richmond, he installed a Kegerator in the executive mansion. To seal a deal with a Chinese paper manufacturer, he traveled to China, gobbled up a plate of three fried cicadas — considered a delicacy — and then ordered another.[Related: Chinese paper company to set up shop in Richmond suburbs]“He will go anywhere. He will call anybody. He will invite you over the executive mansion for lunch and dinner and then he will invite you over to the state capitol and give you a personal tour,” said Maurice Jones, Virginia Secretary of Commerce and Trade.“He will call some executive in the morning and say, ‘I bet the governor of Tennessee or Pennsylvania didn’t call you this morning. But guess what, you were the first person I thought about when I woke up this morning!’” Jones added. “Everyone knows it’s a joke, but it’s just one of the ways he tries to touch people.”McAuliffe became a millionaire at a young age and earned $9.5 million in 2012 alone. As a political fundraiser in private life, he pounded the phone lines asking again and again for campaign donations.As co-founder of GreenTech, an American company that bought a Chinese electric car manufacturer, McAuliffe was once on the other side of the bargaining table. He discussed incentives for the company with Virginia officials and later was criticized for allowing the company to open a manufacturing facility in Mississippi.As governor he has traveled twice to China, including once to finalize a deal for a Chinese paper-making facility, when he crunched on cicadas. He has used his expansive Rolodex to call on just about any executive he thinks might be willing to take a look at the commonwealth, including a call he placed to Rex W. Tillerson, Exxon chairman and chief executive, to aid a deal for Inova to buy Exxon’s Merrifield campus.John Boyd, a New Jersey relocation consultant who has advised companies including PepsiCo (PEP) and Dell, said that his clients that have worked with McAuliffe personally have been “very impressed.”“Terry McAuliffe is a superstar in corporate board rooms,” Boyd said. “He is very much a pro-business Democrat, and lots of powerful incentives are being created in Virginia.”The governor’s staff has tallied 362 business additions or expansions in the state since he came into office, including 256 that they say required the state’s support and 41 that received financial incentives.Among them are a $9.5 million incentive package to help the advisory firm CEB build a new Arlington headquarters and $5.25 million to persuade Stone Brewing Co. to build a brewery, restaurant and retail store in Richmond, a deal the governor sealed in part by visiting the company in San Diego and bringing in the Kegerator.McAuliffe has steered a cultural middle road in his pursuit of new business. In wooing Indiana companies, he wrote a letter saying that, “in Virginia, we do not discriminate against our friends and neighbors, particularly those who are supporting local businesses and generating economic activity.” He will fly to Cuba to promote trade.Unlike many other local Democrats, however, he has not criticized the name Redskins, a moniker many Native American groups consider a racial slur but one that is borne by a team for which he would like to build a new stadium.[Related: McAuliffe on Redskins stadium in Virginia: ‘It’s where they belong’]It may be too early to tell whether all the activity has moved the needle for the state’s economy, but there are other opportunities to grow the private sector on the horizon, upon which McAuliffe keeps close tabs.In February, Arne M. Sorenson, the chief executive of Marriott International (MAR), took many local officials by surprise when he said the company would move its headquarters, even though its lease isn’t up for another seven years. McAuliffe had already pitched him on Virginia.Harris Corp., a defense communications giant, became another top target when it announced plans to acquire McLean-based Exelis (XLS). As it stands, Harris has 13,000 employees, including 1,500 in Virginia and 400 at its Florida headquarters.Rumors of its possible consolidation in Virginia have grown to the degree that the company issued a regulatory filing saying it was “evaluating potential headquarter locations.”It’s unlikely that McAuliffe will land any of the Indiana companies he and his staff pitched, among them pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly (LLY), Cummins manufacturing and furniture maker Kimball International.But he will keep working the phones and he expects county officials to do the same. At a recent tech announcement in Crystal City, with more than 100 people in attendance, McAuliffe yelled out to the county’s new economic development director, Victor L. Hoskins: “I am expecting great things out of you, buddy.”In other words: Get out there and make some calls.Follow Jonathan O’Connell on Twitter: @oconnellpostbiz




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    Here's the clearest sign yet of the decline of cable television: Cablevision (CVC) is offering a new broadband Internet package aimed at getting users to cut the cable cord.On Thursday the cable and broadband Internet provider announced monthly broadband Internet packages between $35 and $45 that come with a digital antenna for free local broadcasting and access to WiFi hotspots in its service area of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and parts of Pennsylvania. With the new broadband offering, users can add HBO Now for $15 a month and additional streaming subscription services. By picking and choosing streaming services, the company said, consumers will be able to replace the cable television bundle of hundreds of channels.Cablevision's announcement comes amid a dramatic shakeup of the traditional cable television industry, with Verizon FiOs also departing from the big cable bundle with new, slimmer packages at lower cost. The cable firms have seen users steadily drop cable subscriptions, and the pressure is on to adapt to new competition online as cable programming from the likes of ESPN (DIS), HBO (TWX) and  Viacom (VIA) offer their own streaming services.“As a connectivity company, Cablevision (CVC) is reimagining its relationship with its customers,” Kristin Dolan, chief operating officer of Cablevision (CVC), said in a release. “Our new ‘cord cutter’ packages take a modern approach to traditional triple-product bundles and provide real alternatives that fit new consumer lifestyles."Consumers would be charged an additional $4.95 monthly modem lease fee and taxes. The prices announced Thursday are promotional offerings and will increase after the first year.Cablevision (CVC) has been among the  most experimental of cable companies with new streaming partnerships. Its executives have long touted the company's future as a broadband Internet provider, saying the traditional cable business wouldn't be an area for future growth. Cablevision (CVC) is HBO's (TWX) only cable partner for its streaming.More reading:Fox, NBC join ESPN (DIS) in protest over Verizon's (VZ) slimmer bundlesThe FCC just dealt Comcast (CMCSA) a major blow




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    Opinion: Big cloud unit could have spin-out potential. SAN FRANCISCO-- Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN), as expected, broke out for the first time the details of its cloud computing business, also known as AWS, with the disclosure that the business was also slightly profitable. Still, the news that AWS had revenue of $1.57 billion in the first quarter, and net income of $265 million, did not manage to offset Amazon's (AMZN) overall net loss of $57 million, or 12 cents a share, as it continued to spend on building new...

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    Mexico's America Movil (AMX) on Thursday reported a 41 percent drop in first-quarter net profit compared to the same period a year earlier, driven by exchange rate losses. The telecoms company, which is controlled by the family of billionaire Carlos Slim, said profit in the January-March period was 8.227 billion pesos, compared to 13.887 billion pesos a year earlier.

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    Google launched a new U.S. wireless service on Wednesday. For $20 a month, Google customers will get text, Wi-Fi tethering and international coverage in over 120 countries. The crazy amounts N.Y.C. parents are spending on kiddie entertainment.

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    Comcast Corp's (CMCSA) board was meeting late on Thursday to finalize plans to abandon its proposed $45 billion merger with Time Warner Cable Inc (TWC), according to a person directly familiar with the matter. An announcement is expected as early as Friday, the person added, asking not to be identified because the deliberations are confidential.

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    Microsoft Corp.' s stock jumped 2.5% in after-hours trade Thursday, after the software giant beat fiscal third-quarter profit and sales expectations. For the quarter ended March 31, earnings fell to $6.59 billion, or 61 cents a share, from $6.97 billion, or 68 cents a share, in the same period a year ago, beating the FactSet consensus of 51 cents a share. Revenue rose to $21.73 billion from $20.4 billion, with commercial revenue increasing 5% to $12.8 billion, above the FactSet...

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    E-commerce company Amazon.com Inc's (AMZN) quarterly revenue rose 15 percent, helped by higher revenue from North America, its biggest market, and its fast-growing cloud-computing services unit. The company reported a loss of $57 million, or 12 cents per share, for the first quarter ended March 31 compared with a profit of $108 million, or 23 cents per share, a year earlier.

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    The Federal Trade Commission announced a consent order Thursday with Nomi Technologies, which it said did not abide by its own promises to allow consumers to opt out of being tracked while they shop.This is the first enforcement action by the FTC against a retail tracking company.Nomi is one of several companies that have developed ways to use consumers' cellphones to track their real world movements for commercial purposes. According to the FTC complaint, the company used censors in stores to collect the MAC address -- a code unique to each phone -- of a shopper's smartphone when the device searched for WiFi networks, a thing many phones do almost constantly by default. The movements of users both in and outside these stores were tracked by this unique ID along with the device type, when the shopper was observed and the signal strength of the device, which could be used to tell how nearby a shopper was.Nomi collected information on about 9 million mobile devices during the first nine months of 2013, the FTC alleged. It used a technique called "hashing" to obscure MAC addresses that could be used to identify a particular smartphone. But it still generated a unique code that was associated with those devices allowing them to be tracked over time and potentially revealing sensitive information about a shopper's movements, according to the FTC.The company used the tracking information to give retailers insight into their customer base -- for instance, how many repeat customers they had during a given period and how long consumers stayed in the store, the FTC said.These reports did not share information about specific shoppers, but the FTC found Nomi had violated its own privacy policy.Nomi did not provide a way for consumers an in-store way to opt out of being tracked, as it promised in late 2012, the complaint alleged -- in fact, consumers were not told they were being tracked at all. It did provide a way to opt out through its Web site, but that was not enough, according to the FTC.“It’s vital that companies keep their privacy promises to consumers when working with emerging technologies, just as it is in any other context,” said Jessica Rich, director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection in a news release. “If you tell a consumer that they will have choices about their privacy, you should make sure all of those choices are actually available to them."Under the terms of the settlement, Nomi agreed to abide by its privacy promises and not misrepresent consumers' options to block being tracked. The agreement will be open for public comments for 30 days before the commission finalizes it. The commission voted 3-2 to issue the complaint and accept the consent order, with Commissioners Maureen Ohlhausen and Joshua Wright dissenting.Nomi said in a statement that it was pleased with the agreement. "We continually review our privacy policies to ensure that they follow best practices and had already made the recommended changes in pursuit of that goal by updating our privacy policy over a year and a half ago," the statement said.