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    - The elite WGC-Match Play Championship will be staged in Austin, Texas, from 2016 to 2019 as part of a four-year deal with its new title sponsor, the International Federation of PGA Tours announced on Tuesday.

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    Matthew D. Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptographer who helped uncover the encryption flaw, said any requirement to weaken security adds complexity that hackers can exploit.“ You’ re going to add gasoline onto a fire,” said Green.“ When we say this is going to make things weaker, we’ re saying this for a reason.” Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the ACLU, said“...

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    Matthew D. Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptographer who helped uncover the encryption flaw, said any requirement to weaken security adds complexity that hackers can exploit.“ You’ re going to add gasoline onto a fire,” said Green.“ When we say this is going to make things weaker, we’ re saying this for a reason.” Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the ACLU, said“...

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    Matthew D. Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptographer who helped uncover the encryption flaw, said any requirement to weaken security adds complexity that can undermine security in a world in which sites are under relentless attack by hackers.“ You’ re going to add gasoline onto a fire,” said Green.“ When we say this is going to make things weaker, we’ re saying this for a reason.”...

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    Technology companies are scrambling to fix a major security flaw that for more than a decade left users of Apple and Google (GOOG) devices vulnerable to hacking when they visited hundreds of thousands of supposedly secure Web sites, including Whitehouse.gov, NSA.gov and FBI.gov. Matthew D. Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptographer who helped uncover the encryption flaw,...

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    Technology companies are scrambling to fix a major security flaw that for more than a decade left users of Apple and Google (GOOG) devices vulnerable to hacking when they visited millions of supposedly secure Web sites, including Whitehouse.gov, NSA.gov and FBI.gov. Matthew D. Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptographer who helped investigate the encryption flaw, said any...

  • Show Article Details

    Matthew D. Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptographer who helped uncover the encryption flaw, said any requirement to weaken security adds complexity that hackers can exploit.“ You’ re going to add gasoline onto a fire,” said Green.“ When we say this is going to make things weaker, we’ re saying this for a reason.” Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the ACLU, said“...

  • Show Article Details

    Matthew D. Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptographer who helped uncover the encryption flaw, said any requirement to weaken security adds complexity that hackers can exploit.“ You’ re going to add gasoline onto a fire,” said Green.“ When we say this is going to make things weaker, we’ re saying this for a reason.” Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the ACLU, said“...

  • Show Article Details

    Technology companies are scrambling to fix a major security flaw that for more than a decade left users of Apple and Google (GOOG) devices vulnerable to hacking when they visited hundreds of thousands of supposedly secure Web sites, including Whitehouse.gov, NSA.gov and FBI.gov. Matthew D. Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptographer who helped uncover the encryption flaw,...

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    The Italian government approved a plan on Tuesday to bring its high-speed broadband network into line with European Union targets, but it held back from forcing operators to replace their copper-wire networks with fiber-optic cable.

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    * Chairman says FCC will be flexible, pragmatic on web rules. * U.S. broadband providers to be regulated more closely. * Europe also working on net neutrality policy. * U.S. to hold next spectrum auction in Q1 2016. By Leila Abboud and Alina Selyukh.

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    We don't know why Hillary Clinton chose to handle all of her email correspondence through a personal account instead of a government-issued email address, but while we may think that one type of account is more secure than another, the truth is that no email is ever really private. Clinton, who is widely expected to seek the Democratic presidential nomination, used a personal email address during her tenure and, contrary to the Federal Records Act, her aides took no actions to...